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TicTacToe and Modules in D

Posted by Aldacron, in D, Projects 02 December 2012 · 1,424 views

Given that my BorderWatch project has languished on github for months without any updates beyond the first few days of random hacking, it's going to be a while before it can serve as an example of game programming in D. So I had some free time recently and decided to do something different. I put together a simple TicTacToe game, that I call T3, and put the source up on github.

T3 is not a complete game. When it starts, you can play two players, one with the mouse and one on the keypad. You can press space after each game to clear the board, and Esc to exit the game at any time. That's all it is or, in the master branch at least, will ever be. It shows some very basic features of D and I hope can be used as a starting point for people new to D to play around with. Maybe by adding a menu screen and a UI, some AI, networking... whatever.

I've never programmed a TicTacToe game before and didn't consult any source for this one, so don't be surprised if you see something weird. However, there are a couple of architectural points that I want to highlight.

One of the features of D whose usefulness can be overlooked is that of the module. In C++, it is quite common for each class to have its own source file, sometimes even multiple files. And the declaration and implementation are often separated between header and source. C++ classes that are "friends" can have access to each other's internals. It is even more common in Java to see one class per file (and without the declaration/implementation divide), but without the help of the friend keyword. In D, it's much more useful to think in terms not of files or classes, but of modules.

Modules are designed to be used as something analogous to a C++ namespace. You group common functionality into a common module, the difference being that one module equates to one file. It was quite natural for me to start thinking in terms of modules (to an extent... see below), as that's what I have always done when programming with C -- individual C source files are often referred to as modules, and a common C idiom is to group common functionality in a single file. Others may not have such an easy time with it.

So as a result of this focus on modules, you find features that might be surprising. For example, you can have protection attributes (such as public, package and private) at the module level. Modules can have their own (static) constructors. But one module feature that really trips people up is that private class or struct members are visible throughout the entire module in which they are declared.

Take, for example, the tt.game module in T3. The abstract Player class declares a private member, _mark (on line 173 as of this writing). Scroll down a bit to the Game class and you'll see that it accesses this member directly. On first blush, that appears to be a severe violation of the encapsulation principle of OOP. But if you think about it, it really isn't. In this case, the game class needs to perform gets and sets for a player's mark. I could have used D's @property attribute to provide a convenient getter/setter pair in the player class, but that would be rather pointless given that both classes are in the same module. One of the oft-cited reasons (and a good one) for encapsulation is that it can hide changes to an implementation. But here, anyone changing the implementation, maybe by adding some sort of calculation every time _mark is accessed, will always have access to the game class because they are in the same module. Make the changes, get compiler errors, search/replace in the same module to fix them, done. If the outside world needed to have access to Player's _mark, then property accessors would be the right thing (especially if it were in a library).

The converse is true, too. In C++, I rarely, if ever, had variables in a source file that were declared outside of a class, static to the module, but accessed by that class. In D, I do it all the time. An example of that is seen in tt.main, where the module-private _game instance is used by the HumanPlayer class and also by the module-level functions below it. These days, on the rare occasions when I toy around with C++, I often find myself declaring certain variables in an anonymous namespace to be shared by two or more classes in the same file.

Another consequence of thinking in modules is that free functions become less of an issue. In earlier posts on this blog, I had a dilemma over whether or not to use free functions for a library I was wanting to develop. This is the one issue I had with fully embracing the module concept. In C, this problem just doesn't manifest because you're always dealing with free functions. But mixing free functions with objects just feels... dirty. Plus there's the potential for name clashes, and no one likes the this_is_a_function syntax common in C. In C++, there is an easy solution: wrap the free functions in a namespace. There are different ways to handle this in D. The most straightforward is just to not worry about namespace conflicts. When they do arise, the fully-qualified package name can be prefixed to the function name at the call site. I mostly accept this now, but as you can see in tt.gfx and tt.audio, I still add a prefix to free functions whose names I am certain will have a conflict (gfxInit and audioInit, for example). I have no practical reason for avoiding typing tt.gfx.init() at the call site. It's just a personal quirk.

If you do decide to do something with the code, please make sure to give the README a once-over. I would like to highlight the following paragraph.

Pull requests with new game features will likely not be accepted. I would like to keep this simple and useful as a toy for new D users. I might very well create a branch with multiplayer and AI for myself to play around with, but I really want to keep the master as-is. However, I'll happily accept pull requests for bug fixes and improvements to the build script (gdc & ldc support, for example).


This code is just a playground for anyone looking to experiment with D, so while I would love to see people do cool stuff with it, I'd rather not put any of that cool stuff into the master branch.

As an aside, I just realized that I didn't add a license to the repository. I'll take care of that pronto. For the record, I'm releasing this as public domain, with the exception of the Derelict bindings in the import directory which are released under the Boost Software License.
I'm overdue for part 5 of my Binding D to C series. I'll be sure to get that at some point over the next couple of weeks. Thanks for reading.




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