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Sprite Packing in Python…

  Posted by jwezorek, 06 January 2013 · 1,217 views

I’ve been working on my puzzle game Syzygy again, after a long hiatus, and am now writing to iOS/cocos2d-x rather than just working on the prototype I had implemented to Win32.

The way that you get sprite data into cocos2d is by including as a resource a sprite sheet image and a .plist file which is XML that specifies which sprite is where. Plists are apparently an old Mac thing — I had never heard of this format. .plists describing a lot of sprites would be a chore to write by hand so there is a cottage industry of sprite packing applications.

I tried out one called TexturePacker and liked it a lot — except that it is crippleware; I need a few features that are only in the full version; plus I can’t stand crippleware; and I think $30 is too much for something that I can write myself over the weekend. So I decided to write my own sprite packer over the weekend.

The result is pypacker, a python script: source code here. Usage is like

pypacker -i <input> -o <output> -m <mode> -p

where
  • <input> = a path to a directory containing image files. (In any format supported by the python PIL module.)
  • <output> = a path + filename prefix for the two output files e.g. given C:\foo\bar the script will generate C:\foo\bar.png and c:\foo\bar.plist
  • <mode> = the packing mode. Can be either “grow” or fixed dimensions such as “256×256″. “grow” tells the algorithm to begin packing rectangles from a blank slate expanding the packing as necessary. “256×256″ et. al. tell the algorithm to start with the given image size and pack sprites into it by subdivision, throwing an error if they all won’t fit.
  • -p = optional flag indicating you want the output image file dimensions padded to the nearest power-of-two-sized square.
The algorithm I used is a recursive bin packing algorithm in which sprites are placed one-by-one into a binary tree. I based it directly on Jake Gordon’s work in Javascript for generating sprite sheets for use in CSS, described here, only my algorithm is sort of like version 2 of his i.e. I fixed an issue that bugged me about his algorithm.

The core of the algorithm is a function that looks like this:
def pack_images( named_images, grow_mode, max_dim):
    root=()
    while named_images:
        named_image = named_images.pop()
        if not root:
            if (grow_mode):
                root = rect_node((), rectangle(0, 0, named_image.img.size[0], named_image.img.size[1]))
            else:
                root = rect_node((), rectangle(0, 0, max_dim[0], max_dim[1]))
            root.split_node(named_image)
            continue
        leaf = find_empty_leaf(root, named_image.img)
        if (leaf):
            leaf.split_node(named_image)
        else:
            if (grow_mode):
                root.grow_node(named_image)
            else:
                raise Exception("Can't pack images into a %d by %d rectangle." % max_dim)
    return root
We iterate through the images we want to pack. For each image, try to find a rectangular node in the tree that can contain the image. If one exists, place the image in the node and subdivide the node such that the remaining space, not taken up by the image, is available in the tree (this is what ‘split_node’ does). If such a node cannot be found, throw an exception if we are not in ‘grow’ mode or expand the root rectangle node to accommodate the new image if we are in ‘grow’ mode.

This routine is very similar to the Javascript implementation I linked to above. The difference is in the details about the structure of the binary tree. Jake Gordon’s Javascript implementation uses a node type that stores an image in the upper left and has children that he calls ‘right’ and ‘down’ like this:
Posted Image
Since actual data is always burnt into the upper left, it means that the tree can never subdivide into this space; we can never recurse into the upper left. This results in the grow_node routine being awkward to write. When we grow the root we either want to extend to the right or extend down, if the upper left can be a node and not image data this is a simple matter of creating a new node and making the the existing root its upper or left child. Anyway, Jake Gordon’s implementation results in a packing tree that cannot both grow right and grow down simultaneously because it would have been complicated to implement this. This limitation is not a problem practically as long as you sort the images from largest to smallest before running the packing algorithm — a standard heuristic from the bin packing literature.

I however wanted to see if the standard sorting heuristic is really accomplishing anything. I wanted to be able to pack rectangles in random order. I therefore simplified the trinary node structure of the Javascript implementation into true binary nodes either oriented horizontally or vertically like this:
Posted Image
Further now only leafs can contain images and if a node is not a leaf it always has two valid, that is non-null, children. Using this type of tree structure makes the full grow_node routine more or less trivial.

Beyond that, I’m using the following heuristics:
  • if the orientation (horizontally or vertically) of a split is not forced, split with the orientation that will result in the new empty node having the largest area
  • If the orientation of growing the root rect is not forced, grow in the direction that leads to the smallest increase in the maximum side length of the root rectangle. (This heuristic enforces squarishness and is extremely important. Without doing this the grow version of the algorithm is basically unusable, and in this sense this grow heuristic can be considered part of the algorithm rather than a heuristic that can be swapped out)
Sorting by size (max side length) turns out be about a 6% improvement with this algorithm. Here’s 500 rects packed with sorting (top) and without (bottom):
Posted Image

Posted Image

EDIT: Actually the version I posted isn’t the one that can handle expanding right and down simultaneously. (Although it doesn’t effect results because sorting by size is hardcoded into the script). Will post the newer version soon…

Source




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