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#ActualMJP

Posted 09 July 2012 - 11:56 AM

Going for fixed-function first might make things initially a bit easier, but personally I think it would mostly be a waste of time. The fixed-function pipeline just has too much old cruft and too many quirks that are the product of old hardware that no longer exists. I think the better path would be start with really simple shaders, and start building up functionality in the context of a shader-based framework. This will ensure that you start out learning how modern GPU's actually work, instead of getting coming to false conclusions due to using a severely outdated abstraction of graphics hardware.

#2MJP

Posted 08 July 2012 - 10:50 PM

Going for fixed-function first might make things initially a bit easier, but personally I think it would mostly be a waste of time. The fixed-function pipeline just has too much old cruft and too many quirks that are the product of old hardware that no longer exists. I think the better path would be start with really simple shaders, and start building up functionality in the context of a shader-based framework. This will ensure that you start out learning how modern GPU's actually work, instead of getting coming to false conclusions due to using a severely outdated abstraction of graphics hardware/

#1MJP

Posted 08 July 2012 - 10:49 PM

Going for fixed-function first might make things initially a bit easier, but I personally I think it would mostly be a waste of time. The fixed-function pipeline just has too much old cruft and too many quirks that are the product of old hardware that no longer exists. I think the better path would be start with really simple shaders, and start building up functionality in the context of a shader-based framework. This will ensure that you start out learning how modern GPU's actually work, instead of getting coming to false conclusions due to using a severely outdated abstraction of graphics hardware/

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