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#Actualtom_mai78101

Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:45 AM

If I continue to rely on dynamic version checking (by programming a conditional flag that makes the app detect the right Android OS version, and using that conditional flag to run codes targeted for specific versions of Android), would it make the Android app development more or less manageable?

The reason I ask this, is that in Android SDK, if I were to develop an app for Ice Cream Sandwich, I would see some deprecated values, and sometimes I might get confused with which deprecated functions should I intentionally use.

And there may be a possible scenario that two or more developers were working on the same project targeting at different Android versions. Some lead developer of the team wanted to merge the project together, so that developer A continues the work for Gingerbread, while developer B continues for Ice Cream Sandwich. More like the term branching, the project is then branched into seperate minor projects that ultimately decides the fate of the app itself.

Would that also have an outcome, all because that the menu button and the search button is useless in Android 4.0 on older Android smartphones?

#1tom_mai78101

Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:39 AM

If I continue to rely on dynamic version checking (by programming a conditional flag that makes the app detect the right Android OS version, and using that conditional flag to run codes targeted for specific versions of Android), would it make the Android app development more or less manageable?

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