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#ActualHodgman

Posted 04 August 2012 - 07:49 PM

I had a thought last night about how this will work -- Your vision is broken into 3 zones:
\  B  /
A\   /C
__\_/__
Only the left eye can see zone A, both eyes see zone B (the stereo zone), and only the right eye can see zone C.

Regular stereoscopic monitors/screens are usually at such a distance that they appear entirely in zone B, so when you render the left-eye/right-eye images, they're almost the same, with only a small offset/rotation differing between them.

However, if this thing is supposed to almost fill your entire visual field, then it would be wasteful for the left-eye image to render anything in zone C and for the right-eye image to render anything in zone A. Ideally, the left-eye screen would be positioned (via a lens) to fill A+B, and the right-eye screen would be positioned to fill B+C. If this was the case, then a certain percent of your pixels would be overlapping, but the rest would be unique to each eye, which would increase the apparent resolution much past 640 pixels...

I wonder if this is the case, or whether the device will only fill zone B? Or whether it will wastefully fill A+B+C for both eyes?

#5Hodgman

Posted 04 August 2012 - 07:46 PM

I had a thought last night about how this will work -- Your vision is broken into 3 zones:
\  B  /
A\   /C
__\_/__
Only the left eye can see zone A, both eyes see zone B (the stereo zone), and only the right eye can see zone C.

Regular stereoscopic monitors/screens are usually at such a distance that they appear entirely in zone B, so when you render the left-eye/right-eye images, they're almost the same, with only a small offset/rotation differing between them.

However, if this thing is supposed to almost fill your entire visual field, then it would be wasteful for the left-eye image to render anything in zone C and for the right-eye image to render anything in zone A. Ideally, the left-eye screen would be positioned (via a lens) to fill A+B, and the right-eye screen would be positioned to fill B+C. If this was the case, then a certain percent of your pixels would be overlapping, but the rest would be unique to each eye, which would increase the apparent resolution much past 640 pixels...

I wonder if this is the case, or whether the device will only fill zone B?

#4Hodgman

Posted 04 August 2012 - 07:46 PM

I had a thought last night about how this will work -- Your vision is broken into 3 zones:
\  B  /
A\   /C
__\_/__
Only the left eye can see zone A, both eyes see zone B (the stereo zone), and only the right eye can see zone C.

Regular stereoscopic monitors/screens are usually at such a distance that they appear entirely in zone B, so when you render the left-eye/right-eye images, they're almost the same, with only a small offset/rotation differing between them.

However, if this thing is supposed to almost fill your entire visual field, then it would be wasteful for the left-eye image to render anything in zone C and for the right-eye image to render anything in zone A. Ideally, the left-eye screen would be positioned to fill A+B, and the right-eye screen would be positioned to fill B+C. If this was the case, then a certain percent of your pixels would be overlapping, but the rest would be unique to each eye, which would increase the apparent resolution much past 640 pixels...

I wonder if this is the case, or whether the device will only fill zone B?

#3Hodgman

Posted 04 August 2012 - 07:44 PM

I had a thought last night about how this will work -- Your vision is broken into 3 zones:
\  B  /
A\   /C
__\_/__
Only the left eye can see zone A, both eyes see zone B (the stereo zone), and only the right eye can see zone C.

Regular stereoscopic monitors/screens are usually at such a distance that they appear entirely in zone B, so when you render the left-eye/right-eye images, they're almost the same, with only a small offset/rotation differing between them.

However, if this thing is supposed to almost fill your entire visual field, then it would be wasteful for the left-eye image to render anything in zone C and for the right-eye image to render anything in zone A. Ideally, the left-eye screen would fill A+B, and the right-eye screen would fill B+C. If this was the case, then a certain percent of your pixels would be overlapping, but the rest would be unique to each eye, which would increase the apparent resolution much past 640 pixels...

I wonder if this is the case, or whether it will only fill zone B?

#2Hodgman

Posted 04 August 2012 - 07:44 PM

I had a thought last night about how this will work -- Your vision is broken into 3 zones:
\  B  /
A\   /C
__\_/__
Only the left eye can see zone A, both eyes see zone B (the stereo zone), and only the right eye can see zone C.

Regular stereoscopic monitors/screens are usually at such a distance that they appear entirely in zone B, so when you render the left-eye/right-eye images, they're almost the same, with only a small offset/rotation differing between them.

However, if this thing is supposed to almost fill your entire visual field, then it would be wasteful for the left-eye image to render anything in zone C and for the right-eye image to render anything in zone A. Ideally, the left-eye screen would fill A+B, and the right-eye screen would fill B+C. If this was the case, then a certain percent of your pixels would be overlapping, but the rest would be unique to each eye, which would increase the apparent resolution much past 640 pixels...

I wonder if this is the case, or whether it will only fill zone B?

#1Hodgman

Posted 04 August 2012 - 07:44 PM

I had a thought last night about how this will work -- Your vision is broken into 3 zones:
\  B  /
A\   /C
__\_/__
Only the left eye can see zone A, both eyes see zone B (the stereo zone), and only the right eye can see zone B.

Regular stereoscopic monitors/screens are usually at such a distance that they appear entirely in zone B, so when you render the left-eye/right-eye images, they're almost the same, with only a small offset/rotation differing between them.

However, if this thing is supposed to almost fill your entire visual field, then it would be wasteful for the left-eye image to render anything in zone C and for the right-eye image to render anything in zone A. Ideally, the left-eye screen would fill A+B, and the right-eye screen would fill B+C. If this was the case, then a certain percent of your pixels would be overlapping, but the rest would be unique to each eye, which would increase the apparent resolution much past 640 pixels...

I wonder if this is the case, or whether it will only fill zone B?

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