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#Actual3Ddreamer

Posted 04 August 2012 - 09:03 PM

Considering Open-source as a software with an accessible code...

Is it possible to make a fully featured game only for learning purposes which uses only open source components from start to finish?

Sure, you can. But I didn't understand the "components" part.
If you want to make your game open-source, just share the source code files with it.
Or... if you're talking about using open-source tools ( rendering, audio, phisycs engines like ogre, irrlicht, bullet, etc). Yes, you can use these tools to make a game.

By components I meant the tools and all else such as programming language(s) and content. In the case of my first few games which are for learning, I am assuming that the game engine will be integrated into the game. So yes, your answer was on the right track because I believe that I will need to start with already available tools, open source ones being my preference and customize them for my needs. I would like to avoid making much of the content such as 3D objects - though can make them - on the very first games so I can focus more time on learning the game structure and the language.

To sort of invert the question, is there any major aspect of games which might not be open source such as the programming language or unusual tools such as for advanced effects or the complex damage model which I want? The C# looks proprietary to me, but that does not necessarily mean that I cannot use it to make tools free of royalty for a marketed game in the future which is my property does it? Researching the legal aspects of using things is ongoing for me, I see.

As for source code, I looked at definitions online and I am confused as to whether outside aquired tools would be considered part of the source code. If I get something nice going very early, yes, I would like to release it as open source once the bugs are gone. The ealiest games might be released with some bugs for getting help on them. I believe that sharing would not only help others but they could look at my work and offer ways to improve my game development, too. Early in my learning, the proprietary issues would not apply to me because it is only the practice stage and not going to be marketed.


Can it be made to run on OS X or Windows and DirectX or OpenGL while still being made only with open source things?

It depends what kind of tools do you want to use. For example Ogre, Irrlicht and Bullet (physics library ) support Windows, Mac OS X and linux
For APIs: DirectX only supports Windows and OpenGL 3.x supports Windows, Mac OS X, linux.

Ogre is something that interests me but I attempted to log into their forum several times and the registration process would not get past the verification stage. Irrlicht looked good in many ways but I am trying to find a path which is an open source programming language for the long term if that is possible. Though it has a bunch of languages unofficially being used with it, Irrlicht seems to have proprietary issues always attached to it such as some XML extensions. No doubt the proprietary things cannot be avoided entirely but I want to avoid as many as possible so I can use as many open source tools as possible in the long term for a marketed game. As I learn languages of course I will be able to create things which were missing previous.

Hey, please understand that I am not knocking the nice collections of extensions available for the recommended games, but I am trying to skip as many dead end cul de sacs as possible, though I know that there will be some.


Is there such a thing as any open source computer programming languages which are good for creating a computer game?

You are implementing incorrectly the word "Open-source".
By the way, the commonly used language in PC and console game programming is C++. For Android development Java. For iOS development Objective-C.


Yes, C++ is the most common - got that but thanks. Are you saying otherwise that there is no real open source language which would be a consideration?

Thanks for the answers, riverreal



Hopefully the headset of the site doesn't mind my double quoting like this - hee, hee.Posted Image

Good stuff!


3Ddreamer

#13Ddreamer

Posted 04 August 2012 - 09:02 PM

Considering Open-source as a software with an accessible code...

Is it possible to make a fully featured game only for learning purposes which uses only open source components from start to finish?

Sure, you can. But I didn't understand the "components" part.
If you want to make your game open-source, just share the source code files with it.
Or... if you're talking about using open-source tools ( rendering, audio, phisycs engines like ogre, irrlicht, bullet, etc). Yes, you can use these tools to make a game.

By components I meant the tools and all else such as programming language(s) and content. In the case of my first few games which are for learning, I am assuming that the game engine will be integrated into the game. So yes, your answer was on the right track because I believe that I will need to start with already available tools, open source ones being my preference and customize them for my needs. I would like to avoid making much of the content such as 3D objects - though can make them - on the very first games so I can focus more time on learning the game structure and the language.

To sort of invert the question, is there any major aspect of games which might not be open source such as the programming language or unusual tools such as for advanced effects or the complex damage model which I want? The C# looks proprietary to me, but that does not necessarily mean that I cannot use it to make tools free of royalty for a marketed game in the future which is my property does it? Researching the legal aspects of using things is ongoing for me, I see.

As for source code, I looked at definitions online and I am confused as to whether outside aquired tools would be considered part of the source code. If I get something nice going very early, yes, I would like to release it as open source once the bugs are gone. The ealiest games might be released with some bugs for getting help on them. I believe that sharing would not only help others but they could look at my work and offer ways to improve my game development, too. Early in my learning, the proprietary issues would not apply to me because it is only the practice stage and not going to be marketed.


Can it be made to run on OS X or Windows and DirectX or OpenGL while still being made only with open source things?

It depends what kind of tools do you want to use. For example Ogre, Irrlicht and Bullet (physics library ) support Windows, Mac OS X and linux
For APIs: DirectX only supports Windows and OpenGL 3.x supports Windows, Mac OS X, linux.

Ogre is something that interests me but I attempted to log into their forum several times and the registration process would not get past the verification stage. Irrlicht looked good in many ways but I am trying to find a path which is an open source programming language for the long term if that is possible. Though it has a bunch of languages unofficially being used with it, Irrlicht seems to have proprietary issues always attached to it such as some XML extensions. No doubt the proprietary things cannot be avoided entirely but I want to avoid as many as possible so I can use as many open source tools as possible in the long term for a marketed game. As I learn languages of course I will be able to create things which were missing previous.

Hey, please understand that I am not knocking the nice collections of extensions available for the recommended games, but I am trying to skip as many dead end cul de sacs as possible, though I know that there will be some.


Is there such a thing as any open source computer programming languages which are good for creating a computer game?

You are implementing incorrectly the word "Open-source".
By the way, the commonly used language in PC and console game programming is C++. For Android development Java. For iOS development Objective-C.


Yes, C++ is the most common - got that but thanks. Are you saying otherwise that there is no real open source language which would be a consideration?

Thanks for the answers, riverreal



Hopefully the headset of the site doesn't mind double quoting like this - hee, hee.Posted Image

Good stuff!


3Ddreamer

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