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#ActualOrymus3

Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:47 AM

Got a cite for that? "A 1991 experiment conducted on a model made to ancient standards at the University of Toronto showed that a well-coordinated trebuchet crew could fire four rounds per minute." Although, later on the same article says the bigger, later versions were very slow... but hurled huge stones. There's a size / range / rate of fire tradeoff going on here.

This was a traction not a torsion trebuchet. This is an important difference between the two technologies. Also, it was much smaller and fires lighter objects which is also required to factor.

One of many refs:
Firing a trebuchet was not a safe job in battle, though. Because of the time required to load the sling and to raise the counterweight, a large trebuchet's rate of fire was very slow: often not more than a couple of shots an hour.

Also:

” The effectiveness of the trebuchet in a siege was formidable because of its capacity to hit the same target repeatedly with precision. In 1244 Bishop Durand of Albi designed a trebuchet for the siege of Montsegur that hurled a succession of missiles weighing 40 kilograms at the same point at the wall… at twenty-nine minute intervals
until in battered an opening."


Can be read here:
- Christopher Coreden, A Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases (Cambridge, 2005) p279.
- Joseph and Frances Gies, Life in a Medieval Castle (New York, 1974) p192.

You have to take into account the fact that at least a third of that time was used to get the ammunitions to proximity, then, you have to take into account the amount of time it took the reload the trebuchet (specifically, by raising the counterweight and placing the ammunition into place). Also, this isn't a mindless firing contest. The idea was to fire repeatedly at the same target with great precision to pierce a hole in the wall, which took some time to aim as well.


Interestingly enough, counterweight trebuchet (late middle ages) : "The cycle rate could be noteworthy: at the siege of Lisbon (1147), two engines were capable of launching a stone every 15 seconds" which means one could fire every 30 seconds or so.
Unfortunately, the damage dealt, accuracy and range were not nearly as impressive.

I strongly recommend analysis readings on the Strategikon (the one falsely attributed to Emperor Maurice) as it contains an entire chapter on siege weaponry tactics. A number of scholars have performed in-depth analysis of this collection of articles...


Fame will aid in strengthening friendship ties with other kingdoms, attracting heros and allow for better terms pertaining to trade.. Fame also, will reduce the chance in which soldiers rebel against you as they have more confidence in your rule. Fame will increase over time when you accomplish some criteria such as ensuring that there is minimal/no food deficit, success in battles. Hence, fame is more of an accumulation which can help in the future.

I like the idea of a resource increasing when you avoid specific "bad situations". This means there is a finite maximum increase over time (which allows for balancing by the developer) and allow you to force external concepts into this abstract formula. For example, if you don't want the political scenerary because this is too complex, you can just temporarily lower the fame gain rate everytime they kill civilians for example. Wonderful abstraction!

#4Orymus3

Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:43 AM

Got a cite for that? "A 1991 experiment conducted on a model made to ancient standards at the University of Toronto showed that a well-coordinated trebuchet crew could fire four rounds per minute." Although, later on the same article says the bigger, later versions were very slow... but hurled huge stones. There's a size / range / rate of fire tradeoff going on here.

This was a traction not a torsion trebuchet. This is an important difference between the two technologies. Also, it was much smaller and fires lighter objects which is also required to factor.

One of many refs:
Firing a trebuchet was not a safe job in battle, though. Because of the time required to load the sling and to raise the counterweight, a large trebuchet's rate of fire was very slow: often not more than a couple of shots an hour.

Also:

” The effectiveness of the trebuchet in a siege was formidable because of its capacity to hit the same target repeatedly with precision. In 1244 Bishop Durand of Albi designed a trebuchet for the siege of Montsegur that hurled a succession of missiles weighing 40 kilograms at the same point at the wall… at twenty-nine minute intervals
until in battered an opening."


Can be read here:
- Christopher Coreden, A Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases (Cambridge, 2005) p279.
- Joseph and Frances Gies, Life in a Medieval Castle (New York, 1974) p192.

Interestingly enough, counterweight trebuchet (late middle ages) : "The cycle rate could be noteworthy: at the siege of Lisbon (1147), two engines were capable of launching a stone every 15 seconds" which means one could fire every 30 seconds or so. Unfortunately, the damage dealt and range were not nearly as impressive.

I strongly recommend analysis readings on the Strategikon (the one falsely attributed to Emperor Maurice) as it contains an entire chapter on siege weaponry tactics. A number of scholars have performed in-depth analysis of this collection of articles...


Fame will aid in strengthening friendship ties with other kingdoms, attracting heros and allow for better terms pertaining to trade.. Fame also, will reduce the chance in which soldiers rebel against you as they have more confidence in your rule. Fame will increase over time when you accomplish some criteria such as ensuring that there is minimal/no food deficit, success in battles. Hence, fame is more of an accumulation which can help in the future.

I like the idea of a resource increasing when you avoid specific "bad situations". This means there is a finite maximum increase over time (which allows for balancing by the developer) and allow you to force external concepts into this abstract formula. For example, if you don't want the political scenerary because this is too complex, you can just temporarily lower the fame gain rate everytime they kill civilians for example. Wonderful abstraction!

#3Orymus3

Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:42 AM

Got a cite for that? "A 1991 experiment conducted on a model made to ancient standards at the University of Toronto showed that a well-coordinated trebuchet crew could fire four rounds per minute." Although, later on the same article says the bigger, later versions were very slow... but hurled huge stones. There's a size / range / rate of fire tradeoff going on here.

This was a traction not a torsion trebuchet. This is an important difference between the two technologies. Also, it was much smaller and fires lighter objects which is also required to factor.

One of many refs:
Firing a trebuchet was not a safe job in battle, though. Because of the time required to load the sling and to raise the counterweight, a large trebuchet's rate of fire was very slow: often not more than a couple of shots an hour.

Also:

” The effectiveness of the trebuchet in a siege was formidable because of its capacity to hit the same target repeatedly with precision. In 1244 Bishop Durand of Albi designed a trebuchet for the siege of Montsegur that hurled a succession of missiles weighing 40 kilograms at the same point at the wall… at twenty-nine minute intervals until in battered an opening."

Interestingly enough, counterweight trebuchet (late middle ages) : "The cycle rate could be noteworthy: at the siege of Lisbon (1147), two engines were capable of launching a stone every 15 seconds" which means one could fire every 30 seconds or so. Unfortunately, the damage dealt and range were not nearly as impressive.

I strongly recommend analysis readings on the Strategikon (the one falsely attributed to Emperor Maurice) as it contains an entire chapter on siege weaponry tactics. A number of scholars have performed in-depth analysis of this collection of articles...


Fame will aid in strengthening friendship ties with other kingdoms, attracting heros and allow for better terms pertaining to trade.. Fame also, will reduce the chance in which soldiers rebel against you as they have more confidence in your rule. Fame will increase over time when you accomplish some criteria such as ensuring that there is minimal/no food deficit, success in battles. Hence, fame is more of an accumulation which can help in the future.

I like the idea of a resource increasing when you avoid specific "bad situations". This means there is a finite maximum increase over time (which allows for balancing by the developer) and allow you to force external concepts into this abstract formula. For example, if you don't want the political scenerary because this is too complex, you can just temporarily lower the fame gain rate everytime they kill civilians for example. Wonderful abstraction!

#2Orymus3

Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:39 AM

Got a cite for that? "A 1991 experiment conducted on a model made to ancient standards at the University of Toronto showed that a well-coordinated trebuchet crew could fire four rounds per minute." Although, later on the same article says the bigger, later versions were very slow... but hurled huge stones. There's a size / range / rate of fire tradeoff going on here.

This was a traction not a torsion trebuchet. This is an important difference between the two technologies. Also, it was much smaller and fires lighter objects which is also required to factor.

One of many refs:
Firing a trebuchet was not a safe job in battle, though. Because of the time required to load the sling and to raise the counterweight, a large trebuchet's rate of fire was very slow: often not more than a couple of shots an hour.

Interestingly enough, counterweight trebuchet (late middle ages) : "The cycle rate could be noteworthy: at the siege of Lisbon (1147), two engines were capable of launching a stone every 15 seconds" which means one could fire every 30 seconds or so. Unfortunately, the damage dealt and range were not nearly as impressive.

I strongly recommend analysis readings on the Strategikon (the one falsely attributed to Emperor Maurice) as it contains an entire chapter on siege weaponry tactics. A number of scholars have performed in-depth analysis of this collection of articles...


Fame will aid in strengthening friendship ties with other kingdoms, attracting heros and allow for better terms pertaining to trade.. Fame also, will reduce the chance in which soldiers rebel against you as they have more confidence in your rule. Fame will increase over time when you accomplish some criteria such as ensuring that there is minimal/no food deficit, success in battles. Hence, fame is more of an accumulation which can help in the future.

I like the idea of a resource increasing when you avoid specific "bad situations". This means there is a finite maximum increase over time (which allows for balancing by the developer) and allow you to force external concepts into this abstract formula. For example, if you don't want the political scenerary because this is too complex, you can just temporarily lower the fame gain rate everytime they kill civilians for example. Wonderful abstraction!

#1Orymus3

Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:35 AM

Got a cite for that? "A 1991 experiment conducted on a model made to ancient standards at the University of Toronto showed that a well-coordinated trebuchet crew could fire four rounds per minute." Although, later on the same article says the bigger, later versions were very slow... but hurled huge stones. There's a size / range / rate of fire tradeoff going on here.

This was a traction not a torsion trebuchet. This is an important difference between the two technologies. Also, it was much smaller and fires lighter objects which is also required to factor.

One of many refs:
Firing a trebuchet was not a safe job in battle, though. Because of the time required to load the sling and to raise the counterweight, a large trebuchet's rate of fire was very slow: often not more than a couple of shots an hour.


Fame will aid in strengthening friendship ties with other kingdoms, attracting heros and allow for better terms pertaining to trade.. Fame also, will reduce the chance in which soldiers rebel against you as they have more confidence in your rule. Fame will increase over time when you accomplish some criteria such as ensuring that there is minimal/no food deficit, success in battles. Hence, fame is more of an accumulation which can help in the future.

I like the idea of a resource increasing when you avoid specific "bad situations". This means there is a finite maximum increase over time (which allows for balancing by the developer) and allow you to force external concepts into this abstract formula. For example, if you don't want the political scenerary because this is too complex, you can just temporarily lower the fame gain rate everytime they kill civilians for example. Wonderful abstraction!

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