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#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:16 AM

Brian raises some excellent points and good strategies for bringing this up to the team. Others have touch on using loops vs. "real" composing and the impact (or lack therefo) to the player. I'd like to add two more points:

1) It's never a bad thing to acquire and learn new software if you feel it will bring something useful to your workflow and sound pallete.

Each time I've been hired for an in-house job, the company had an existing rig for me to work on. While a company might be open to purchasing a few items just for me, the overall set up was unified with the rest of the audio team. So knowing a variety of platforms often helped me make faster transitions and I believe was one of the contributing factors to me landing the job. I've changed from PC to Mac and due to both in-house and freelance situations I've worked on all of the following platforms since 2000:

(not listed in any particular order)
Cakewalk Sonar
Acid Pro
Finale
Cubase
Logic
Pro Tools (both HD and LE rigs)
Reason (and Record when it was still around)
Digital Performer
Reaper

Was I a master at all of them? Doubtful. But audio software is a lot like different brands of cars. They all do basically the same core actions although labels and the processes might differ slightly. So you learn one and master it - taking on new ones is much easier. Also I didn't use all of them at one time either. Now I mainly use Logic, Reason and Pro Tools depending on the job.

2) Make purchases when it suits YOU and your studio, not when it suits just the developer.

I'm assuming you have a contract but you've mentioned there's a chance (perhaps only a slight one) this project will not make money. It sounds like there's some risk involved with this production and that's okay. How would you feel if you purchase Magix, finish you work on this project only to find you earn nothing? Would you feel good about that purchase? Would Magix Music Maker remain a tool you reach for in the future on other products? Or would it just sit on your shelf, unused?

My suggestion would be if Magix isn't going to remain a key part of your toolset then don't purchase it. Instead look at the real problem - your set of sounds is lacking. I think it would be a better solution to invest money into higher quality samples which wont make you change your workflow or approach to composition and would remain a wise investment in your studio for this project as well as future ones.

Best of luck!

Nate

#6nsmadsen

Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:15 AM

Brian raises some excellent points and good strategies for bringing this up to the team. Others have touch on using loops vs. "real" composing and the impact (or lack therefo) to the player. I'd like to add two more points:

1) It's never a bad thing to acquire and learn new software if you feel it will bring something useful to your workflow and sound pallete.

Each time I've been hired for an in-house job, the company had an existing rig for me to work on. While a company might be open to purchasing a few items just for me, the overall set up was unified with the rest of the audio team. So knowing a variety of platforms often helped me make faster transitions and I believe was one of the contributing factors to me landing the job. I've changed from PC to Mac and due to both in-house and freelance situations I've worked on all of the following platforms since 2000:

(not listed in any particular order)
Cakewalk Sonar
Acid Pro
Finale
Cubase
Logic
Pro Tools (both HD and LE rigs)
Reason (and Record when it was still around)
Digital Performer
Reaper

Was I a master at all of them? Doubtful. But audio software is a lot like different brands of cars. They all do basically the same core actions although labels and the processes might differ slightly. So you learn one and master it - taking on new ones is much easier. Also I didn't use all of them at one time either. Now I mainly use Logic, Reason and Pro Tools depending on the job.

2) Make purchases when it suits YOU and your studio, not when it suits just the developer.

I'm assuming you have a contract but you've mentioned there's a chance (perhaps only a slight one) this project will not make money. It sounds like there's some risk involved with this production and that's okay. How would you feel if you purchase Magix, finish you work on this project only to find you earn nothing? Would you feel good about that purchase? Would Magix Music Maker remain a tool you reach for in the future on other products? Or would it just sit on your shelf, unused?

My suggestion would be if Magix isn't going to remain a key part of your toolset then don't purchase it. Instead look at the real problem - your set of sounds is lacking. I think it would be a better solution to invest money into high quality samples which wont make you change your workflow or approach to composition and would remain a wise investment in your studio for this project as well as future ones.

Best of luck!

Nate

#5nsmadsen

Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:15 AM

Brian raises some excellent points and good strategies for bringing this up to the team. Others have touch on using loops vs. "real" composing and the impact (or lack therefo) to the player. I'd like to add two more points:

1) It's never a bad thing to acquire and learn new software if you feel it will bring something useful to your workflow and sound pallete.

Each time I've been hired for an in-house job, the company had an existing rig for me to work on. While a company might be open to purchasing a few items just for me, the overall set up was unified with the rest of the audio team. So knowing a variety of platforms often helped me make faster transitions and I believe was one of the contributing factors to me landing the job. I've changed from PC to Mac and due to both in-house and freelance situations I've worked on all of the following platforms since 2000:

(not listed in any particular order)
Cakewalk Sonar
Acid Pro
Finale
Cubase
Logic
Pro Tools (both HD and LE rigs)
Reason (and Record when it was still around)
Digital Performer
Reaper

Was I a master at all of them? Doubtful. But audio software is a lot like different brands of cars. They all do basically the same core actions although labels and the processes might differ slightly. So you learn one and master it - taking on new ones is much easier. Also I didn't use all of them at one time either. Now I mainly use Logic, Reason and Pro Tools depending on the job.

2) Make purchases when it suits YOU and your studio, not when it suits just the developer.

I'm assuming you have a contract but you've mentioned there's a chance (perhaps only a slight one) this project will not make money. It sounds like there's some risk involved with this production and that's okay. How would you feel if you purchase Magix, finish you work on this project only to find you earn nothing? Would you feel good about that purchase? Would Magix Music Maker remain a tool you reach for in the future on other products? Or would it just sit on your shelf, unused?

My suggestion would be if Magix isn't then don't purchase it. Instead look at the real problem - your set of sounds is lacking. I think it would be a better solution to invest money into high quality samples which wont make you change your workflow or approach to composition and would remain a wise investment in your studio for this project as well as future ones.

Best of luck!

Nate

#4nsmadsen

Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:13 AM

Brian raises some excellent points and good strategies for bringing this up to the team. Others have touch on using loops vs. "real" composing and the impact (or lack therefo) to the player. I'd like to add two more points:

1) It's never a bad thing to acquire and learn new software if you feel it will bring something useful to your workflow and sound pallete.

Each time I've been hired for an in-house job, the company had an existing rig for me to work on. While a company might be open to purchasing a few items just for me, the overall set up was unified with the rest of the audio team. So knowing a variety of platforms often helped me make faster transitions and I believe was one of the contributing factors to me landing the job. I've changed from PC to Mac and due to both in-house and freelance situations I've worked on all of the following platforms since 2000:

(not listed in any particular order)
Cakewalk Sonar
Acid Pro
Finale
Cubase
Logic
Pro Tools (both HD and LE rigs)
Reason (and Record when it was still around)
Digital Performer
Reaper

Was I a master at all of them? Doubtful. But audio software is a lot like different brands of cars. They all do basically the same core actions although labels and the processes might differ slightly. So you learn one and master it - taking on new ones is much easier. Also I didn't use all of them at one time either. Now I mainly use Logic, Reason and Pro Tools depending on the job.

2) Make purchases when it suits YOU and your studio, not when it suits just the developer.

I'm assuming you have a contract but you've mentioned there's a chance (perhaps only a slight one) this project will not make money. It sounds like there's some risk involved with this production and that's okay. How would you feel if you purchase Magix, finish you work on this project only to find you earn nothing? Would you feel good about that purchase? Would Magix Music Maker remain a tool you reach for in the future on other products?

My suggestion would be if Magix isn't then don't purchase it. Instead look at the real problem - your set of sounds is lacking. I think it would be a better solution to invest money into high quality samples which wont make you change your workflow or approach to composition and would remain a wise investment in your studio for this project as well as future ones.

Best of luck!

Nate

#3nsmadsen

Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:12 AM

Brian raises some excellent points and good strategies for bringing this up to the team. Others have touch on using loops vs. "real" composing and the impact (or lack therefo) to the player. I'd like to add two more points:

1) It's never a bad thing to acquire and learn new software if you feel it will bring something useful to your workflow and sound pallete.

Each time I've been hired for an in-house job, the company had an existing rig for me to work on. While a company might be open to purchasing a few items just for me, the overall set up was unified with the rest of the audio team. So knowing a variety of platforms often helped me make faster transitions and I believe was one of the contributing factors to me landing the job. I've changed from PC to Mac and due to both in-house and freelance situations I've worked on all of the following platforms since 2000: (not in any particular order)

Cakewalk Sonar (various versions)
Acid Pro
Finale
Cubase
Logic
Pro Tools (both HD and LE rigs)
Reason (and Record when it was still around)
Digital Performer
Reaper

Was I a master at all of them? Doubtful. But audio software is a lot like different brands of cars. They all do basically the same core actions although labels and the processes might differ slightly. So you learn one and master it - taking on new ones is much easier. Also I didn't use all of them at one time either. Now I mainly use Logic, Reason and Pro Tools depending on the job.

2) Make purchases when it suits YOU and your studio, not when it suits just the developer.

I'm assuming you have a contract but you've mentioned there's a chance (perhaps only a slight one) this project will not make money. It sounds like there's some risk involved with this production and that's okay. How would you feel if you purchase Magix, finish you work on this project only to find you earn nothing? Would you feel good about that purchase? Would Magix Music Maker remain a tool you reach for in the future on other products?

My suggestion would be if Magix isn't then don't purchase it. Instead look at the real problem - your set of sounds is lacking. I think it would be a better solution to invest money into high quality samples which wont make you change your workflow or approach to composition and would remain a wise investment in your studio for this project as well as future ones.

Best of luck!

Nate

#2nsmadsen

Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:12 AM

Brian raises some excellent points and good strategies for bringing this up to the team. Others have touch on using loops vs. "real" composing and the impact (or lack therefo) to the player. I'd like to add two more points:

1) It's never a bad thing to acquire and learn new software if you feel it will bring something useful to your workflow and sound pallete.

Each time I've been hired for an in-house job, the company had an existing rig for me to work on. While a company might be open to purchasing a few items just for me, the overall set up was unified with the rest of the audio team. So knowing a variety of platforms often helped me make faster transitions and I believe was one of the contributing factors to me landing the job. I've changed from PC to Mac and due to both in-house and freelance situations I've worked on all of the following platforms: (not in any particular order)

Cakewalk Sonar (various versions)
Acid Pro
Finale
Cubase
Logic
Pro Tools (both HD and LE rigs)
Reason (and Record when it was still around)
Digital Performer
Reaper

Was I a master at all of them? Doubtful. But audio software is a lot like different brands of cars. They all do basically the same core actions although labels and the processes might differ slightly. So you learn one and master it - taking on new ones is much easier. Also I didn't use all of them at one time either. Now I mainly use Logic, Reason and Pro Tools depending on the job.

2) Make purchases when it suits YOU and your studio, not when it suits just the developer.

I'm assuming you have a contract but you've mentioned there's a chance (perhaps only a slight one) this project will not make money. It sounds like there's some risk involved with this production and that's okay. How would you feel if you purchase Magix, finish you work on this project only to find you earn nothing? Would you feel good about that purchase? Would Magix Music Maker remain a tool you reach for in the future on other products?

My suggestion would be if Magix isn't then don't purchase it. Instead look at the real problem - your set of sounds is lacking. I think it would be a better solution to invest money into high quality samples which wont make you change your workflow or approach to composition and would remain a wise investment in your studio for this project as well as future ones.

Best of luck!

Nate

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