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#Actualtheark

Posted 19 August 2012 - 04:24 AM

Okay i'll take a shot in the dark then, I can't tell you which one to go with, because that depends on your dedication and project aim, but I definitely lay the cards on the table.

Do you want full control of your game? Do you need to manage memory yourself, rather than letting the system manage it? Do you want it to run on multi-platforms? Then I'd choose C++, if we compare it to C#, C++ is a lot steeper learning curve, however, if you use the right libraries your application can be cross-platform, run faster (in saying that though, the speed difference probably isn't that noticable, it'll probably be more noticeable the larger the application is), industry standard for the most part, so learning C++ you can be safe in knowing its used throughout the industry.

C# is a Microsoft product, and while the language is very nice, it holds similar routes to Java, so if you hate Java, its likely you'll hate C#. However, its faster to get games out on the table, since you dont need to worry about memory management, and if you use XNA, boilerplate Windows and DirectX code (Also allows you to release for the Xbox). So there is always that route. As far as I know, so don't quote me on this, C# will only run on Windows, due to the CLR, so cross-platformability is dead in the water if you want to release for other platforms.

But, there just the cards, I can't tell you what to do, because thats your choice, and I don't understand your goals/aims/dedication enough to reccomend one over the other, and if I did, it would't always be clear cut, go with what you decide is best.

"The problem with the answer you are looking for is that all languages are good in their own way, even for making games. Sometimes people totally miss that the concepts of programming are more important than the language choice for learning."

This is a good reply, because its true. Dont look at the language features, but instead, look at what you can do with it. And good luck.

"The other thing is about your age, you are quite young, so the industry standard might change by the time you are 20 or something, that's knowing the principles of programming is better than focusing on a language, it means you can pick up any language that happens to come along."

And another, C++ is industry standard now, but whose to say this wont change. Learn one language, it becomes easier to traverse that skill and knowledge to be easier, I learnt PHP and then moved to C++ with relative ease having learnt PHP and its object orientated route. So it really doesn't matter that much.

#1theark

Posted 19 August 2012 - 04:23 AM

Okay i'll take a shot in the dark then, I can't tell you which one to go with, because that depends on your dedication and project aim, but I definitely lay the cards on the table.

Do you want full control of your game? Do you need to manage memory yourself, rather than letting the system manage it? Do you want it to run on multi-platforms? Then I'd choose C++, if we compare it to C#, C++ is a lot steeper learning curve, however, if you use the right libraries your application can be cross-platform, run faster (in saying that though, the speed difference probably isn't that noticable, it'll probably be more noticeable the larger the application is), industry standard for the most part, so learning C++ you can be safe in knowing its used throughout the industry.

C# is a Microsoft product, and while the language is very nice, it holds similar routes to Java, so if you hate Java, its likely you'll hate C#. However, its faster to get games out on the table, since you dont need to worry about memory management, and if you use XNA, boilerplate Windows and DirectX code (Also allows you to release for the Xbox). So there is always that route. As far as I know, so don't quote me on this, C# will only run on Windows, due to the CLR, so cross-platformability is dead in the water if you want to release for other platforms.

But, there just the cards, I can't tell you what to do, because thats your choice, and I don't understand your goals/aims/dedication enough to reccomend one over the other, and if I did, it would't always be clear cut, go with what you decide is best.

"The problem with the answer you are looking for is that all languages are good in their own way, even for making games. Sometimes people totally miss that the concepts of programming are more important than the language choice for learning."

This is a good reply, because its true. Dont look at the language features, but instead, look at what you can do with it. And good luck.

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