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#ActualKarsten_

Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:47 AM

I am a fan of using Vim with a shedload of plugins such as NERDTree and exuberant-ctags to make it into an IDE.

If you need to use Visual Studio, then there are some good vim plugins for it too.

The best thing about Vim is that I can use it on any platform and through SSH and it always looks and works in 100% the same way. Consistency plays a very important part in allowing me to generate acceptable code quickly whereas I find that typical IDEs change too much with each release to be productive.

@mike4,
nmake is akin to make or gmake.
cmake is akin to makefile "makers" such as autotools or bakefile.

If the Makefile is written correctly, it can be understood perfectly by nmake as well as any other make utiity. So yeah it is cross platform. What I tend to have though is multiple Makefiles in a folder.

Makefile.Linux
Makefile.OpenBSD
Makefile.Win32

And then just run it like so...

make -f Makefile.`uname`

#4Karsten_

Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:45 AM

I am a fan of using Vim with a shedload of plugins such as NERDTree and exuberant-ctags to make it into an IDE.

If you need to use Visual Studio, then there are some good vim plugins for it too.

The best thing about Vim is that I can use it on any platform and through SSH and it always looks and works in 100% the same way. Consistency plays a very important part in allowing me to generate acceptable code quickly whereas I find that typical IDEs change too much with each release to be productive.

@mike4,
nmake is akin to make or gmake.
cmake is akin to makefile "makers" such as autotools or bakefile.

If the Makefile is written correctly, it can be understood perfectly by nmake as well as any other make utiity. So yeah it is cross platform.

#3Karsten_

Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:38 AM

I am a fan of using Vim with a shedload of plugins such as NERDTree and exuberant-ctags to make it into an IDE.

If you need to use Visual Studio, then there are some good vim plugins for it too.

The best thing about Vim is that I can use it on any platform and through SSH and it always looks and works in 100% the same way. Consistency plays a very important part in allowing me to generate acceptable code quickly whereas I find that typical IDEs change too much with each release to be productive.

@mike4,
nmake is akin to make or gmake.
cmake is akin to makefile "makers" such as autotools or bakefile.

#2Karsten_

Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:37 AM

I am a fan of using Vim with a shedload of plugins such as NERDTree and exuberant-ctags to make it into an IDE.

If you need to use Visual Studio, then there are some good vim plugins for it too.

The best thing about Vim is that I can use it on any platform and through SSH and it always looks and works in 100% the same way. Consistency plays a very important part in allowing me to generate acceptable code quickly.

@mike4,
nmake is akin to make or gmake.
cmake is akin to makefile "makers" such as autotools or bakefile.

#1Karsten_

Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:36 AM

I am a fan of using Vim with a shedload of plugins such as NERDTree and exuberant-ctags to make it into an IDE.

If you need to use Visual Studio, then there are some good vim plugins for it too.

The best thing about Vim is that I can use it on any platform and through SSH and it always looks and works in 100% the same way. Consistancy plays a very important part of allowing me to generate decent code quickly.

@mike4,
nmake is akin to make or gmake.
cmake is akin to makefile "makers" such as autotools or bakefile.

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