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#Actualsamoth

Posted 27 August 2012 - 12:01 PM

Though choosing the "right" virtualization technique (what's right, and what's wrong?) should be able to avoid this scheduling jitter.

OpenVZ and more recently LXC do virtualization simply by using chroot and by putting processes in each "virtual machine" into a separate namespace. It is not "real" virtualization, if you want to look at it that way, but in my opinion, this is virtualization how it should be.

All processes on the machine run from one scheduler, they all pull their memory pages from one pool, they're all running just like on one machine. Except... they're isolated by their namespaces and jails, and you can give them quotas (if you want). No emulation crap, no obscure hacks, no overhead.

Of course, a malicious process subverting (or even crashing) the kernel will affect all virtual machines, but who cares. When it comes to that, you're kind of lost anyway.

#1samoth

Posted 27 August 2012 - 12:00 PM

Though choosing the "right" virtualization technique (what's right, and what's wrong?) should be able to avoid this scheduling jitter.

OpenVZ and more recently LXC do virtualization simply by using chroot and by putting processes in each "virtual machine" into a separate namespace. It is not "real" virtualization, if you want to look at it that way, but in my opinion, this is virtualization how it should be.

All processes on the machine run from one scheduler, they all pull their memory pages from one pool, they're all running just like on one machine. Except... they're isolated by their namespaces and jails, and you can give them quotas (if you want). No emulation crap, no obscure hacks, no overhead.

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