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#ActualCatmull Dog

Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:07 PM

Making two layers using the surface normals is pretty easy but here are some pitfalls:

1) Which way do you let the user scale the derived surface? Or do you support both thicker and thinner? This effects the lighting as you need to keep the winding order consistent.
2) If the surface is open like a tube, you will need to stitch the layers together at the ends. This is much more of a challenge than just deriving a thicker layer.
3) If you supported cutting holes and stitching pieces together, there are all-new problems when you add thickness, as the two layers (each featuring seamless articulation) are no longer simply offset by the normals, the projected region of intersection needs to be scaled about its midpoint and reprojected onto a slightly different surface.

#4Catmull Dog

Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:05 PM

Making two layers using the surface normals is pretty easy but here are some pitfalls:

1) Which way do you let the user scale the derived surface? Or do you support both thicker and thinner? This effects the lighting as you need to keep the winding order consistent.
2) If the surface is open like a tube, you will need to stitch the layers together at the ends. This is much more of a challenge than just deriving a thicker layer.
3) If you supported cutting holes and stitching pieces together, there are all-new problems when you add thickness, as they are no longer simply offset by the normals. thickness).

#3Catmull Dog

Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:05 PM

Making two layers using the surface normals is pretty easy but here are some pitfalls:

1) Which way do you let the user scale the derived surface? Or do you support both thicker and thinner? This effects the lighting as you need to keep the winding order consistent.
2) If the surface is open like a tube, you will need to stitch the layers together at the ends. This is much more of a challenge.
3) If you supported cutting holes and stitching pieces together, there are all-new problems when you add thickness, as they are no longer simply offset by the normals. thickness).

#2Catmull Dog

Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:04 PM

Making two layers using the surface normals is pretty easy but here are some pitfalls:

1) Which way do you let the user scale the derived surface? Or do you support both thicker and thinner? This effects the lighting as you need to keep the winding order consistent.
2) If the surface is open like a tube, you will need to stitch the layers together at the seams. This is much more of a challenge.
3) If you supported cutting holes and stitching pieces together, there are all-new problems when you add thickness, as they are no longer simply offset by the normals. thickness).

#1Catmull Dog

Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:04 PM

Making two layers using the surface normals is pretty easy but here are some pitfalls:

1) Which way do you let them scale "slave" surface? Or do you support both thicker and thinner? This effects the lighting as you need to keep the winding order consistent.
2) If the surface is open like a tube, you will need to stitch the layers together at the seams. This is much more of a challenge.
3) If you supported cutting holes and stitching pieces together, there are all-new problems when you add thickness, as they are no longer simply offset by the normals. thickness).

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