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#Actuala Smith

Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:26 PM

I'm a little bit confused on how this plot deals with suicide. In the first game it's simply a background note--the main character's parents both comitted suicide. How integral are they to the main storyline? After all, the main character from game one doesn't commit suicide, he's simply murdered. I do like the idea of the character being forced to commit such an outrageous act, but this leads me to ponder Orson Scott Card's series beginning with Ender's Game, and I think an audience would be more intrigued with how the main character deals with his own horrific acts (and not the corrupt millitary).

In your second game, the one in which a PC actually commits suicide, you've presented us with an entirely different conundrum. Character B is psycopathic, and finds joy in using his spaceship to destroy things (which I can sort of understand as a way of using entertainment to distract from the constant emptiness of depression). Maybe with more details I could come to understand this character better, but as it stands he/she simply seems deranged. It's like trying to relate to someone who brutally murders their family and then commits suicide.

I tend to agree with Sunandshadow that it feels like you're sort of alienating your audience right from the start, but I believe you misunderstood her point. The issue is not that your characters are aliens--people can relate to all sorts of things just fine (Avatar, Wall-E, and, my favorite example, Journey). In Journey the characters are only vaguely humanoid, and their technology is fantastically magical, but the reflection of our own world is obvious (even without a single line of text). Journey also addresses the idea of death and rebirth to an extent (which seems like what your game is really about, the suicide is merely incidental). I believe what will really alienate your audience is just how much focus you seem to want to place on these horrific planets--they're nightmare worlds, of course everyone who lives on them wants to die. Yes, our world is certainly tragic, but only the blindest cynic would consider it as hopeless as these mirror worlds you have suggested.

The concept of making suicide a part of the game is interesting, certainly, but if you really want to get something relatable that will make your audience think (instead of simply having the chance to offend them) you need to tone down the absolute despair. Make a character your audience can sympathise with.

I think you should also consider what comes after suicide. To me it sounds like you are punishing your characters, raging against someone who is willing to give in. Why can't suicide be the unsettling blackness? Isn't the fact that your character chose suicide sad enough without them having to fall into Dante's Inferno?

#1a Smith

Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:23 PM

I'm a little bit confused on how this plot deals with suicide. In the first game it's simply a background note--the main character's parents both comitted suicide. How integral are they to the main storyline? After all, the main character from game one doesn't commit suicide, he's simply murdered. I do like the idea of the character being forced to commit such an outrageous act, but this leads me to ponder Orson Scott Card's series beginning with Ender's Game, and I think an audience would be more intrigued with how the main character deals with his own horrific acts (and not the corrupt millitary).

In your second game, the one in which a PC actually commits suicide, you've presented us with an entirely different conundrum. Character B is psycopathic, and finds joy in using his spaceship to destroy things (which I can sort of understand as a way of using entertainment to distract from the constant emptiness of depression). Maybe with more details I could come to understand this character better, but as it stands he/she simply seems deranged. It's like trying to relate to someone who brutally murders their family and then commits suicide.

I tend to agree with Sunandshadow that it feels like your sort of alienating your audience right from the start, but I believe you misunderstood her point. The issue is not that your characters are aliens--people can relate to all sorts of things just fine (Avatar, Wall-E, and, my favorite example, Journey). In Journey the characters are only vaguely humanoid, and their technology is fantastically magical, but the reflection of our own world is obvious (even without a single line of text). Journey also addresses the idea of death and rebirth to an extent (which seems like what your game is really about, the suicide is merely incidental). I believe what will really alienate your audience is just how much focus you seem to want to place on these horrific planets--they're nightmare worlds, of course everyone who lives on them wants to die. Yes, our world is certainly tragic, but only the blindest cynic would consider it as hopeless as these mirror worlds you have suggested.

The concept of making suicide a part of the game is interesting, certainly, but if you really want to get something relatable that will make your audience think (instead of simply having the chance to offend them) you need to tone down the absolute despair. Make a character your audience can sympathise with.

I think you should also consider what comes after suicide. To me it sounds like you are punishing your characters, raging against someone who is willing to give in. Why can't suicide be the unsettling blackness? Isn't the fact that your character chose suicide enough without them having to fall into Dante's Inferno?

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