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#ActualKarsten_

Posted 06 September 2012 - 05:57 PM

This is actually a really interesting question.

I kinda feel that game engines are now a little bit deprecated. For example we no longer need a large monolithic "thing" to control our games logic.

If we say split our example game's core tech up into the libraries used. e.g...

OpenGL (graphics)
OpenAL (sound)
Glut (OS/Graphics binding layer)
ODE (physics collision)
Lua (entity scripting)

Would all of the above class as an engine?

Lets say I created a very small hierarchical entity management system to add objects and screens to the world easily... Would this very small bit be the engine and the other stuff be kinda like the plugins? Or maybe the shader manager defines an engine? This afterall, is generally where I spend the most lines of code.

Perhaps in the days of Quake 1 when there wasn't really the OpenGL or DirectX there is today, an "engine" had much more of a meaning. Now, games development is often more about integrating other libraries suited best to their role. An engine would be a limitation since it would get in the way if I wanted to use an alternative sound system for example..

#5Karsten_

Posted 06 September 2012 - 05:56 PM

This is actually a really interesting question.

I kinda feel that game engines are now a little bit deprecated. For example we no longer need a large monolithic "thing" to control our games logic.

If we say split our example game's core tech up into the libraries used. e.g...

OpenGL (graphics)
OpenAL (sound)
Glut (OS/Graphics binding layer)
ODE (physics collision)
Lua (entity scripting)

Would all of the above class as an engine?

Lets say I created a very small hierarchical entity management system to add objects and screens to the world easily... Would this very small bit be the engine and the other stuff be kinda like the plugins? Or maybe the shader manager defines an engine? This afterall, is generally where I spend the most lines of code.

Perhaps in the days of Quake 1 when there wasn't really the OpenGL or DirectX there is today, an "engine" had much more of a meaning. Now, games development is often more about integrating other libraries suited best to their role. An engine would be a limitation.

#4Karsten_

Posted 06 September 2012 - 05:56 PM

This is actually a really interesting question.

I kinda feel that game engines are now a little bit deprecated. For example we no longer need a large monolithic "thing" to control our games logic.

If we say split our example game's core tech up into the libraries used. e.g...

OpenGL (graphics)
OpenAL (sound)
Glut (OS/Graphics binding layer)
ODE (physics collision)
Lua (entity scripting)

Would all of the above class as an engine?

Lets say I created a very small hierarchical entity management system to add objects and screens to the world easily... Would this very small bit be the engine and the other stuff be kinda like the plugins? Or maybe the shader manager defines an engine? This afterall, is generally where I spend the most lines of code.

Perhaps in the days of Quake 1 when there wasn't really the OpenGL or DirectX there is today, an "engine" had much more of a meaning. Now, games development is often much more about integrating other libraries suited best to their role. An engine would be a limitation.

#3Karsten_

Posted 06 September 2012 - 05:55 PM

This is actually a really interesting question.

I kinda feel that game engines are now a little bit deprecated. For example we no longer need a large monolithic "thing" to control our games logic.

If we say split our example game's core tech up into the libraries used. e.g...

OpenGL (graphics)
OpenAL (sound)
Glut (OS/Graphics binding layer)
ODE (physics collision)
Lua (entity scripting)

Would all of the above class as an engine?

Lets say I created a very small hierarchical entity management system to add objects and screens to the world easily... Would this very small bit be the engine and the other stuff be kinda like the plugins? Or maybe the shader manager defines an engine? This afterall, is generally where I spend the most lines of code.

Perhaps in the days of Quake 1 when there wasn't really the OpenGL there is today, an "engine" had much more of a meaning. Now, games development is often much more about integrating other libraries suited best to their role. An engine would be a limitation.

#2Karsten_

Posted 06 September 2012 - 05:54 PM

This is actually a really interesting question.

I kinda feel that game engines are now a little bit deprecated. For example we no longer need a large monolithic "thing" to control our games logic.

If we say split our example game's core tech up into the libraries used. e.g...

OpenGL (graphics)
OpenAL (sound)
Glut (OS/Graphics binding layer)
ODE (physics collision)
Lua (entity scripting)

Would all of the above class as an engine?

Lets say I created a very small hierarchical entity management system to add objects and screens to the world easily... Would this very small bit be the engine and the other stuff be kinda like the plugins? Or maybe the shader manager?

Perhaps in the days of Quake 1 when there wasn't really the OpenGL there is today, an "engine" had much more of a meaning. Now, games development is often much more about integrating other libraries suited best to their role. An engine would be a limitation.

#1Karsten_

Posted 06 September 2012 - 05:53 PM

This is actually a really interesting question.

I kinda feel that game engines are now a little bit deprecated. For example we no longer need a large monolithic "thing" to control our games logic.

If we say split our example game's core tech up into the libraries used. e.g...

OpenGL (graphics)
OpenAL (sound)
Glut (OS/Graphics binding layer)
ODE (physics collision)
Lua (entity scripting)

Would all of the above class as an engine?

Lets say I created a very small hierarchical entity management system to add objects and screens to the world easily... Would this bit be the engine and the other stuff be kinda like the plugins? Or maybe the shader manager?

Perhaps in the days of Quake 1 when there wasn't really the OpenGL there is today, an "engine" had much more of a meaning. Now, games development is often much more about integrating other libraries suited best to their role. An engine would be a limitation.

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