Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#Actualtom_mai78101

Posted 13 September 2012 - 10:28 AM

Theoretically, there is no upper limit.

If you keep an Android uplifted onto its side, and continuously calibrate the G-sensors, it's possible that you can force the X and Y accelerometer to exceed the float value: 9.8

For example, X default value is 0.0.

0.0 > Lift upright > 9.72 > Calibrate > While calibrating, shake the phone rigoriously > you get X := -27.83

Source: I have a shitty phone I borrowed from school, and played its calibrations. Quite happy with it, as an expensive toy. Posted Image

EDIT: I reset the values back to 0, and try this again, so as to take a snapshot for proof. I'm now unable to recreate the values. Posted Image Please ignore the above. I'll re-edit this post and try again tomorrow.

EDIT 2: Forget it, quickly mashed this up and got this:

Posted Image

Note that this is when I put my phone on the table, laying still. So, play around a bit with the G-sensor calibration, and you'll see how fun it is to tinker around.

EDIT 3: Ok, I got one that even exceeded my initial record for max G-force:

Posted Image

#4tom_mai78101

Posted 13 September 2012 - 10:26 AM

Theoretically, there is no upper limit.

If you keep an Android uplifted onto its side, and continuously calibrate the G-sensors, it's possible that you can force the X and Y accelerometer to exceed the float value: 9.8

For example, X default value is 0.0.

0.0 > Lift upright > 9.72 > Calibrate > While calibrating, shake the phone rigoriously > you get X := -27.83

Source: I have a shitty phone I borrowed from school, and played its calibrations. Quite happy with it, as an expensive toy. Posted Image

EDIT: I reset the values back to 0, and try this again, so as to take a snapshot for proof. I'm now unable to recreate the values. Posted Image Please ignore the above. I'll re-edit this post and try again tomorrow.

EDIT 2: Forget it, quickly mashed this up and got this:

Posted Image

Note that this is when I put my phone on the table, laying still. So, play around a bit with the G-sensor calibration, and you'll see how fun it is to tinker around.

#3tom_mai78101

Posted 13 September 2012 - 10:15 AM

Theoretically, there is no upper limit.

If you keep an Android uplifted onto its side, and continuously calibrate the G-sensors, it's possible that you can force the X and Y accelerometer to exceed the float value: 9.8

For example, X default value is 0.0.

0.0 > Lift upright > 9.72 > Calibrate > While calibrating, shake the phone rigoriously > you get X := -27.83

Source: I have a shitty phone I borrowed from school, and played its calibrations. Quite happy with it, as an expensive toy. Posted Image

EDIT: I reset the values back to 0, and try this again, so as to take a snapshot for proof. I'm now unable to recreate the values. Posted Image Please ignore the above. I'll re-edit this post and try again tomorrow.

#2tom_mai78101

Posted 13 September 2012 - 10:14 AM

Theoretically, there is no upper limit.

If you keep an Android uplifted onto its side, and continuously calibrate the G-sensors, it's possible that you can force the X and Y accelerometer to exceed the float value: 9.8

For example, X default value is 0.0.

0.0 > Lift upright > 9.72 > Calibrate > While calibrating, shake the phone rigoriously > you get X := -27.83

Source: I have a shitty, broken phone that a car rode over on, and played its calibrations. Quite happy with it, as an expensive toy. Posted Image

EDIT: I reset the values back to 0, and try this again, so as to take a snapshot for proof. I'm now unable to recreate the values. :( Please ignore the above. I'll re-edit this post and try again tomorrow.

#1tom_mai78101

Posted 13 September 2012 - 10:12 AM

Theoretically, there is no upper limit.

If you keep an Android uplifted onto its side, and continuously calibrate the G-sensors, it's possible that you can force the X and Y accelerometer to exceed the float value: 9.8

For example, X default value is 0.0.

0.0 > Lift upright > 9.72 > Calibrate > While calibrating, shake the phone rigoriously > you get X := -27.83

Source: I have a shitty, broken phone that a car rode over on, and played its calibrations. Quite happy with it, as an expensive toy. :D

PARTNERS