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#ActualHamiltonLagrange

Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:42 PM

Yet another link to Wikipedia: The field is called Machine Translation.


Cool! Other people have been talking about this kind of thing! This makes me happier.

I think natural language parsing is hard. Very hard. Consider for example, the sentence "Mary can stick the stamp on herself." Good for Mary that she doesn;t need help, but will she not end up all sticky? Or, for another example, consider "Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana."


Yep, it would be a very tough problem, but it would be a particularly useful one to solve. But that e-discovery software seems to do something very similar... Even an approximate translation would be better than what we have.

Or, maybe we could just outsource the law to countries where lawyers are paid starvation wages in sweatshops. Our laws would be crap but we could get it cheap and we could wear our sweats to court.


Another brilliant business plan... allowing foreign lawyers to create our laws for us, "Taiwan owns USA by definition, here see: Article 15 Sec 13.24.5553." I hope nobody EVER decides to actually DO that. I don't believe you're being serious with this suggestion, but the sad thing is that I could imagine some half-baked business plan that revolves around outsourcing your Country's laws to another country, not even thinking about the security problems it would introduce...

That could make a really interesting Douglas Adams - style plot.

#4HamiltonLagrange

Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:36 PM

Yet another link to Wikipedia: The field is called Machine Translation.


Cool! Other people have been talking about this kind of thing! This makes me happier.

I think natural language parsing is hard. Very hard. Consider for example, the sentence "Mary can stick the stamp on herself." Good for Mary that she doesn;t need help, but will she not end up all sticky? Or, for another example, consider "Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana."


Yep, it would be a very tough problem, but it would be a particularly useful one to solve. But that e-discovery software seems to do something very similar... Even an approximate translation would be better than what we have.

Or, maybe we could just outsource the law to countries where lawyers are paid starvation wages in sweatshops. Our laws would be crap but we could get it cheap and we could wear our sweats to court.


Another brilliant business plan... allowing foreign lawyers to create our laws for us, "Taiwan owns USA by definition, here see: Article 15 Sec 13.24.5553." I hope nobody EVER decides to actually DO that. I don't believe you're being serious with this suggestion, but the sad thing is that I could imagine some half-baked business plan that revolves around outsourcing your Country's laws to another country, not even thinking about the security problems it would introduce...

#3HamiltonLagrange

Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:29 PM

Yet another link to Wikipedia: The field is called Machine Translation.


Cool! Other people have been talking about this kind of thing! This makes me happier.

I think natural language parsing is hard. Very hard. Consider for example, the sentence "Mary can stick the stamp on herself." Good for Mary that she doesn;t need help, but will she not end up all sticky? Or, for another example, consider "Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana."


Yep, it would be a very tough problem, but it would be a particularly useful one to solve. But that e-discovery software seems to do something very similar...

Or, maybe we could just outsource the law to countries where lawyers are paid starvation wages in sweatshops. Our laws would be crap but we could get it cheap and we could wear our sweats to court.


Another brilliant business plan... allowing foreign lawyers to create our laws for us, "Taiwan owns USA by definition, here see: Article 15 Sec 13.24.5553." I hope nobody EVER decides to actually DO that.

#2HamiltonLagrange

Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:28 PM

Yet another link to Wikipedia: The field is called Machine Translation.


Cool! Other people have been talking about this kind of thing! This makes me happier.

I think natural language parsing is hard. Very hard. Consider for example, the sentence "Mary can stick the stamp on herself." Good for Mary that she doesn;t need help, but will she not end up all sticky? Or, for another example, consider "Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana."


Yep, it would be a very tough problem. But that e-discovery software seems to do something very similar...

Or, maybe we could just outsource the law to countries where lawyers are paid starvation wages in sweatshops. Our laws would be crap but we could get it cheap and we could wear our sweats to court.


Another brilliant business plan... allowing foreign lawyers to create our laws for us, "Taiwan owns USA by definition, here see: Article 15 Sec 13.24.5553." I hope nobody EVER decides to actually DO that.

#1HamiltonLagrange

Posted 21 September 2012 - 02:26 PM

Yet another link to Wikipedia: The field is called Machine Translation.


Cool! Other people have been talking about this kind of thing! This makes me happier.

Or, maybe we could just outsource the law to countries where lawyers are paid starvation wages in sweatshops. Our laws would be crap but we could get it cheap and we could wear our sweats to court.


Another brilliant business plan... allowing foreign lawyers to create our laws for us, "Taiwan owns USA by definition, here see: Article 15 Sec 13.24.5553." I hope nobody EVER decides to actually DO that.

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