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#ActualL. Spiro

Posted 24 September 2012 - 05:23 AM

My first question is, do you guys often do the quick and dirty thing, and then go back to fix it later; or do you get a hold of yourself and make sure you get the job done well, first and foremost?

Do it right the first time. If you can’t figure out exactly how it should be done, don’t do it. Keep planning. Writing algorithms you are not sure how to implement is the best way to create bugs.

Do you refactor while coding, or do you refactor after everything's done?

The only reason to ever refactor is if you simply made a mistake (but you had put enough thought into it that you believed you were doing it correctly originally), or you gained experience and realized a new way to organize code and have the time to do so.
So the general answer is that I refactor on my own projects as soon as I realize a need for it, and in professional settings I refactor based on the weighted sums of the need for refactoring vs. how much time is available for it.
In no cases is refactoring done after everything else is done. Not only do most projects have no end (for example, will there ever be a day when there is not a new feature I could add to my game engine?), but those projects that do have an end…end. They get shipped and you move on. You never think, “I could put this amazing app on the App Store right now! But naw I better spend another week just moving code around, even though the resulting product will be the same.” It doesn’t happen.


When it comes to my own projects, however, I allow myself one exception specifically to accommodate a personality “flaw” of mine.
Sometimes I am in the mood to do nothing but simple and mundane tasks, and if there aren’t any I simply won’t code anything. I will watch a cartoon or something and wast time.
But if there are some to do, I will start doing them, and once I get started I get in the mood to do more and more, and end up adding or at least starting new features.

When I get excited about the end result, sometimes I intentionally copy-paste code instead of moving it into a function (for example) specifically to give me a mundane task that will ultimately end up making me more productive.

Obviously, if you are a normal human being this will not apply to you, and I recommend being strict on the structure of your code at all times.


L. Spiro

#1L. Spiro

Posted 24 September 2012 - 05:22 AM

My first question is, do you guys often do the quick and dirty thing, and then go back to fix it later; or do you get a hold of yourself and make sure you get the job done well, first and foremost?

Do it right the first time. If you can’t figure out exactly how it should be done, don’t do it. Keep planning. Writing algorithms you are not sure how to implement is the best way to create bugs.

Do you refactor while coding, or do you refactor after everything's done?

The only reason to ever refactor is if you simply made a mistake (but you had put enough thought into it that you believed you were doing it correctly originally), or you gained experience and realized a new way to organize code and have the time to do so.
So the general answer is that I refactor on my own projects as soon as I realize a need for it, and in professional settings I refactor based on the weighted sums of the need for refactoring vs. how much time is available for it.
In no cases is refactoring done after everything else is done. Not only do most projects have no end (for example, will there ever be a day when there is not a new feature I could add to my game engine?), but those projects that do have an end…end. They get shipped and you move on. You never think, “I could put this amazing app on the App Store right now! But naw I better spend another week just moving code around, even though the resulting product will be the same.” It doesn’t happen.


When it comes to my own projects, however, I allow myself one except specifically to accommodate a personality “flaw” of mine.
Sometimes I am in the mood to do nothing but simple and mundane tasks, and if there aren’t any I simply won’t code anything. I will watch a cartoon or something and wast time.
But if there are some to do, I will start doing them, and once I get started I get in the mood to do more and more, and end up adding or at least starting new features.

When I get excited about the end result, sometimes I intentionally copy-paste code instead of moving it into a function (for example) specifically to give me a mundane task that will ultimately end up making me more productive.

Obviously, if you are a normal human being this will not apply to you, and I recommend being strict on the structure of your code at all times.


L. Spiro

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