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#ActualGeneralQuery

Posted 25 September 2012 - 01:07 PM


I cannot think of any reasonable justification for a complete beginner learning C++ over something like C#. "Complete freedom" for a beginner = enough rope to hang yourself many times over. There's nothing that cannot be learned faster and easier with other languages without the frustration of the sort of problems C++ can throw at you. Unless you have an academic or professional reason to learn C++ as a first language, I strongly recommend against it.


Again would I still be able to make good things in C#? I know that I am not going to make an amazing game in a day but I still want to make sure that the language I start with is good.


You're getting too hung up on vague generalizations such as is C++ or C# "good" or "better". Better for what purpose? If one was a simple "one size fits all" case of "better" then why would anyone recommend the "worse" language? But in any case, all of this is inconsequential. Learning programming is only marginally to do with a language's syntax, the rest of the skills are transferable. "Better" in your case would be more beginner friendly and forgiving language that has a more gentle learning curve, something C++ fails on all accounts.

#1GeneralQuery

Posted 25 September 2012 - 01:06 PM


I cannot think of any reasonable justification for a complete beginner learning C++ over something like C#. "Complete freedom" for a beginner = enough rope to hang yourself many times over. There's nothing that cannot be learned faster and easier with other languages without the frustration of the sort of problems C++ can throw at you. Unless you have an academic or professional reason to learn C++ as a first language, I strongly recommend against it.


Again would I still be able to make good things in C#? I know that I am not going to make an amazing game in a day but I still want to make sure that the language I start with is good.


You're getting too hung up on vague generalizations such as is C++ or C# "good" or "better". Better for what purpose? If one was a simple "one size fits all" case of "better" then why would anyone recommend the "worse" language? But in any case, all of this is inconsequential. Learning programming is only marginally to do with a language's syntax, the rest of the skills are transferable. "Better" in your case would be more beginner friendly and forgiving and having a more gentle learning curve, something C++ fails on all accounts.

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