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#ActualTom Sloper

Posted 28 September 2012 - 07:34 PM

1. Ok read it all, but still have some questions.
2. (I'll try to contact him trough my mobile. Because an e-mail is a bit too impersonal).
3. So how can I make the publisher trust me?
4. I have the game written, I need to send it to the publisher so he can check my game.. But what if he thinks I'm sending a virus or something?
5. And do I need to find a publisher I can meet in real life? Because I need a lawyer first so he won't run with my game and gets all the profits. But on the 2 links it's not explained how that part works. I have a lawyer, found a publisher but then.. Do I and my lawyer need to travel to the publisher? Because he needs to sign my paper?
6. And a few questions from the first topic weren't really answered.
- Do I need to keep a convention about my game? Maybe a convention where publishers can join and where I need to "sell" my game to them. So they will publish my game?
6. - Publishers only put my game on the market?
7. So how about the trailer on television. How much does it average costs to promote your game on the television? (30seconds preview)
8. - How can I prevent pirating of my game?


Hi Bollaert (or Jonathan, whichever is your first name).
1. That was expected.
2. Yes, good. FAQ 21 does say you should do that.
3. You can't make him trust you. When you phone him, you speak in a businesslike manner. If he's willing to accept a submission from you, then he trusts you enough.
4. I don't think many game submissions managers get many viruses sent to them disguised as game submissions -- it's an awful lot of work for a hacker to go through, to fill out the submission forms and everything.
5. I don't think you read FAQ 21 very thoroughly. To quote the FAQ (edited for brevity):

Determine the submission policy of your target game publishers.
You need to use a "telephone" for your initial contact with the submissions manager... telephone the submissions manager and inquire about the submission policy.
If their policy is, "we don't accept submissions from industry outsiders," well, sorry - you'll have to forget about that company.
[Otherwise,] Get the needed forms, addresses, etc.
Prepare your submission package.
Sign the publisher's Submission Agreement... and give it to the submissions manager together with your game submission. I highly recommend submitting the game in person if you can.

6. No. A publisher does a lot more than that. There are some good books you might want to get so you can learn more about how the game industry works. In particular, "Secrets of the Game Business" and "Introduction to Game Development." http://sloperama.com...ice/lesson8.htm
7. I have no idea. Why do you need to know?
8. You can't. What is it you're worried about, exactly?

#1Tom Sloper

Posted 28 September 2012 - 07:32 PM

1. Ok read it all, but still have some questions.
2. (I'll try to contact him trough my mobile. Because an e-mail is a bit too impersonal).
3. So how can I make the publisher trust me?
4. I have the game written, I need to send it to the publisher so he can check my game.. But what if he thinks I'm sending a virus or something?
5. And do I need to find a publisher I can meet in real life? Because I need a lawyer first so he won't run with my game and gets all the profits. But on the 2 links it's not explained how that part works. I have a lawyer, found a publisher but then.. Do I and my lawyer need to travel to the publisher? Because he needs to sign my paper?
6. And a few questions from the first topic weren't really answered.
- Do I need to keep a convention about my game? Maybe a convention where publishers can join and where I need to "sell" my game to them. So they will publish my game?
6. - Publishers only put my game on the market?
7. So how about the trailer on television. How much does it average costs to promote your game on the television? (30seconds preview)
8. - How can I prevent pirating of my game?



Hi Bollaert (or Jonathan, whichever is your first name).
1. That was expected.
2. Yes, good. FAQ 21 does say you should do that.
3. You can't make him trust you. When you phone him, you speak in a businesslike manner. If he's willing to accept a submission from you, then he trusts you enough.
4. I don't think many game submissions managers get many viruses sent to them disguised as game submissions -- it's an awful lot of work for a hacker to go through, to fill out the submission forms and everything.
5. I don't think you read FAQ 21 very thoroughly. To quote the FAQ (edited for brevity):


Determine the submission policy of your target game publishers.
You need to use a "telephone" for your initial contact with the submissions manager... telephone the submissions manager and inquire about the submission policy.
If their policy is, "we don't accept submissions from industry outsiders," well, sorry - you'll have to forget about that company.
[Otherwise,] Get the needed forms, addresses, etc.
Prepare your submission package.
Sign the publisher's Submission Agreement... and give it to the submissions manager together with your game submission. I highly recommend submitting the game in person if you can.


6. No. A publisher does a lot more than that. There are some good books you might want to get so you can learn more about how the game industry works. In particular, "Secrets of the Game Business" and "Introduction to Game Development." http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson8.htm
7. I have no idea. Why do you need to know?
8. You can't. What is it you're worried about, exactly?

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