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#ActualTobl

Posted 29 September 2012 - 07:21 AM

So did I get this right? When you begin the game, you can choose to either complete mission A, B or C. Upon completion you will be assigned an character-archetype player(A), player(B) or player©, depending on which of the missions you've completed. Then you go on other quests in order to raise your stats and (probably) advance the story. At the end of the game, there is a boss-fight against either dragon(A), dragon(B) or dragon©, depending on which was your first mission to complete.
The concept of the different endbosses could be interesting, but why don't you take it a little further. I don't mean for you to design 200 different dragons, but think of sth. like this:
There are main-quests to advance in skills as well as in story and sidequests which only benefit your skills. Have at least the main quests have several ways of completion with different results on your skills (one giving you new armor, the other a training lesson in swordfight as a classic example). Now add a second, hidden skilltree for the dragon. Each time you complete a sidequest, the dragon gains a predefined skill without the knowledge of the player (get rid of rat-plague: dragon gains +1 in spitting fire). Each time you complete a main quest, the dragon gets a skill in the skilltree, depending on which way you've finished the quest (kill the guard and steal the macguffin: dragon advances on the strength-branch; get the guard what he desires and have him hand over the macguffin: dragon advances on the agility-branch). If you want, you can have the choices slightly unbalanced, so that different kinds of gameplay result in differently hard boss-fights or just be satisfied with the bosses each having different weaknesses and strength. Finally, lean back and enjoy the discussions in the comments below the walkthroughs on how to fight the final dragon.
I realize that this might be too much content to implement if you've only got one term, but if you have the time and ressources, consequent implemention of the main feature is the selling point of many great games.

bw,
Tobl

#1Tobl

Posted 29 September 2012 - 07:20 AM

So did I get this right? When you begin the game, you can choose to either complete mission A, B or C. Upon completion you will be assigned an character-archetype player(A), player(B) or player©, depending on which of the missions you've completed. Then you go on other quests in order to raise your stats and (probably) advance the story. At the end of the game, there is a boss-fight against either dragon(A), dragon(B) or dragon©, depending on which was your first mission to complete.
The concept of the different endbosses could be interesting, but why don't you take it a little further. I don't mean for you to design 200 different dragons, but think of sth. like this:
There are main-quests to advance in skills as well as in story and sidequests which only benefit your skills. Have at least the main quests have several ways of completion with different results on your skills (one giving you new armor, the other a training lesson in swordfight as a classic example). Now add a second, hidden skilltree for the dragon. Each time you complete a sidequest, the dragon gains a predefined skill without the knowledge of the player (get rid of rat-plague: dragon gains +1 in spitting fire). Each time you complete a main quest, the dragon gets a skill in the skilltree, depending on which way you've finished the quest (kill the guard and steal the macguffin: dragon advances on the strength-branch; get the guard what he desires and have him hand over the macguffin: dragon advances on the agility-branch). If you want, you can have the choices slightly unbalanced, so that different kinds of gameplay result in differently hard boss-fights or just be satisfied with the bosses each having different weaknesses and strength. Finally, lean back and enjoy the discussions in the comments below the walkthroughs on how to fight the final dragon.
I realize that this might be too much content to implement if you've got one term, but if you have the time and ressources, consequent implemention of the main feature is the selling point of many great games.

bw,
Tobl

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