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#ActualServant of the Lord

Posted 29 September 2012 - 10:03 AM

How ironical that, the fate of lakhs of C#/XNA devs hang with microsoft

How's that irony? C# devs don't depend on Microsoft - C# is being, or has been, standardized.
XNA is different, but even so, people are working on their own non-Microsoft XNA replacements.

There are many five-ten year old post claiming that C++ will be used for ten years more!!!

You came to this thread with pre-concieved ideas, and you aren't hearing anything except what you already wanted to hear.

After 10 years some foolish like me will ask the same thing, and the answer will be '10 years or so' !!!!

It's not 'foolish' to ask a question, only to ignore the answer.

C++ is likely to be the primary langauge for AAA engine development for the next ten years...
But it will not be the only one, and others will gain more and more ground against it... IF nothing changes.
If hardware and software architectures DO change (which they already are), the entire concept of an "Engine" will probably change over the next ten years, as we head more to Software as a Service.

Even so, even if I right this second could garuntee that C++ will be the primary langauge used for the next 200 years without change... That would still be for AAA engine development, and may not be the best choice for a beginner. Good programmers must learn multiple different langauges - after you learn your first langauge, each additional language (most of the time) is easier to learn. So start with a higher level langauge like Python, and move to C++ or C# or another language, after two years or so when you logically re-evaluate the situation with the current state of the industry.

Quite foolish of me to start this post. I will live in the present, cause future and past never come!!!

Again, asking questions is never foolish.
Yes, focus on the present and the short-term future.
No, don't assume the future will never come.
Yes, you can be 100% sure the past will never come. (Though you can't be sure it won't repeat itself in a new guise)

Be willing to change as technology changes. But don't change with every passing breeze of technology. And for your first few years, focus on one target, regardless of where technology might be heading.

#1Servant of the Lord

Posted 29 September 2012 - 10:02 AM

How ironical that, the fate of lakhs of C#/XNA devs hang with microsoft

How's that irony? Oh, and no C# devs don't depend on Microsoft - C# is being, or has been, standardized.

There are many five-ten year old post claiming that C++ will be used for ten years more!!!

You came to this thread with pre-concieved ideas, and you aren't hearing anything except what you already wanted to hear.

After 10 years some foolish like me will ask the same thing, and the answer will be '10 years or so' !!!!

It's not 'foolish' to ask a question, only to ignore the answer.

C++ is likely to be the primary langauge for AAA engine development for the next ten years...
But it will not be the only one, and others will gain more and more ground against it... IF nothing changes.
If hardware and software architectures DO change (which they already are), the entire concept of an "Engine" will probably change over the next ten years, as we head more to Software as a Service.

Even so, even if I right this second could garuntee that C++ will be the primary langauge used for the next 200 years without change... That would still be for AAA engine development, and may not be the best choice for a beginner. Good programmers must learn multiple different langauges - after you learn your first langauge, each additional language (most of the time) is easier to learn. So start with a higher level langauge like Python, and move to C++ or C# or another language, after two years or so when you logically re-evaluate the situation with the current state of the industry.

Quite foolish of me to start this post. I will live in the present, cause future and past never come!!!

Again, asking questions is never foolish.
Yes, focus on the present and the short-term future.
No, don't assume the future will never come.
Yes, you can be 100% sure the past will never come. (Though you can't be sure it won't repeat itself in a new guise)

Be willing to change as technology changes. But don't change with every passing breeze of technology. And for your first few years, focus on one target, regardless of where technology might be heading.

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