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#ActualEddieV223

Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:00 AM

'pragma' is used to express implementation dependent preprocessor statements. The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses.


#pragma is standard, the uses for it such as 'once' are not. It is a way to provide additional information.


Isn't that exactly what I said? 'pragma' is a pre-processor that allows an implementation to define it's own tokens.


The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses. Such a technique isn't portable if you wanted to jump to a different compiler.

That's the part we are having trouble with. If most compilers support it that makes it rather portable wouldn't you say?

#4EddieV223

Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:00 AM

'pragma' is used to express implementation dependent preprocessor statements. The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses.


#pragma is standard, the uses for it such as 'once' are not. It is a way to provide additional information.


Isn't that exactly what I said? 'pragma' is a pre-processor that allows an implementation to define it's own tokens.


The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses. Such a technique isn't portable if you wanted to jump to a different compiler.

That's the part we are having trouble with. If most compilers support some thing that makes it rather portable wouldn't you say?

#3EddieV223

Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:59 PM

'pragma' is used to express implementation dependent preprocessor statements. The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses.


#pragma is standard, the uses for it such as 'once' are not. It is a way to provide additional information.


Isn't that exactly what I said? 'pragma' is a pre-processor that allows an implementation to define it's own tokens.


The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses. Such a technique isn't portable if you wanted to jump to a different compiler.

That's the part we are having trouble with. It is portable because most compilers support it.

#2EddieV223

Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:57 PM

'pragma' is used to express implementation dependent preprocessor statements. The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses.


#pragma is standard, the uses for it such as 'once' are not. It is a way to provide additional information.


Isn't that exactly what I said? 'pragma' is a pre-processor that allows an implementation to define it's own tokens.


The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses. Such a technique isn't portable if you wanted to jump to a different compiler.

That's the part we are having trouble with.

#1EddieV223

Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:56 PM

'pragma' is used to express implementation dependent preprocessor statements. The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses.


#pragma is standard, the uses for it such as 'once' are not. It is a way to provide additional information.


Isn't that exactly what I said? 'pragma' is a pre-processor that allows an implementation to define it's own tokens.


The idea, the use of 'once' that is, (as far as I know) is specific to the compiler that Visual Studio uses. Such a technique isn't portable if you wanted to jump to a different compiler.

That's the part we are having trouble with.

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