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#ActualVodahmin

Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:02 AM

Not sure what kind of "game company" you're looking for but if it has "guys in suits wearing ties" in HR department instead of real-time programmers, I think something is wrong. There is a video I posted in another thread about how you can get yourself a job at Valve. It seems that degree isn't THAT much valuable after all. The things that professional game studios are usually looking for is whether you can actually accomplish specific tasks in a given time.

According to Chet Feliszek from Valve, one of the most important thing is to actually do something from beginning to end (to ship it). The things they're more interested in than a fancy resume is your portfolio - if you can create a nice demo from scratch (that is creating your own game engine, graphics handler, cache handler etc) and then explain how it works, you'll already a step ahead from people who have fancy degrees but no real experience.

Of course not every company is like Valve - maybe some of them, for some crazy reason, would still require you to have a formal education (even though you already have a nice collection of games in your portfolio) - on the other hand, why working with them? That being said I think a college/university degree should be an addition to your profile, not the focus point.

#1Vodahmin

Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:00 AM

Not sure what kind of "game company" you're looking for but if it has "guys in suits wearing ties" in HR department instead of real-time programmers, I think something is wrong. There is a video I posted in another thread about how you can get yourself a job at Valve. It seems that degree isn't THAT much valuable after all. The things that professional game studios are usually looking for is whether you can actually accomplish specific tasks in a given time.

According to Chet Feliszek from Valve, one of the most important thing is to actually do something from beginning to end (to ship it). The things they're more interested in than a fancy resume is your portfolio - if you can create a nice demo from scratch (that is creating your own game engine, graphics handler, cache handler etc) and then explain how it works, you'll already a step ahead from people who have fancy degrees but no real experience.

Of course not every company is like Valve - maybe some of them, for some crazy reason, would require you to have a formal education - on the other hand, why working with them? That being said I think a college/university degree should be an addition to your profile, not the focus point.

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