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#ActualPointer2APointer

Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:40 AM

How much math do I need to use quantum entanglement theories?

Basically, how much math you need depends on what exactly you do, and how you implement it.

If you want the truth to be told, to go bare-bones and even make a crappy 3-D game yourself, you will have to understand some forms of math.

These can include, but are not limited to:

1.Geometric math.

2.Physics.

3.Vector graphics(pretty much Geometry again).

4.Linear Algebra(stress to say it, but yes, it helps a lot).

Honestly, you don't have to be a math genius, but application of it will be unavoidable at some point(usually the beginning).

The good thing is Geometry, shapes, etc. All that stuff is what little kids/toddlers learn. Math is used everyday for some reason, even if it's just basic arithmetic. Math is shoved in all of our brains, so it's not some "foreign" language you need to newly understand.

Sure, it gets complicated, but most of the time you're limited to mathematics that ONLY apply to game-specific logic and rendering, etc.

One pretty easy way (well, easier, let's say) to use more advanced math in 3D games is in camera rendering through projection matrices, view pointers, eye points from field-of-view projections, and vertex model space positioned by "world space" or matrices(you can think of the 3D land as world space, and many programmers differentiate "object space" from the world, specifically for models and the like).

#4Pointer2APointer

Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:40 AM

How much math do I need to use quantum entanglement theories?

Basically, how much math you need depends on what exactly you do, and how you implement it.

If you want the truth to be told, to go bare-bones and even make a crappy 3-D game yourself, you will have to understand some forms of math.

These can include, but are not limited to:

1.Geometric math.

2.Physics.

3.Vector graphics(pretty much Geometry again).

4.Linear Algebra(stress to say it, but yes, it helps a lot).

Honestly, you don't have to be a math genius, but application of it will be unavoidable at some point(usually the beginning).

The good thing is Geometry, shapes, etc. All that stuff is what little kids/toddlers learn. Math is used everyday for some reason, even if it's just basic arithmetic. Math is shoved in all of our brains, so it's not some "foreign" language you need to newly understand.

Sure, it gets complicated, but most of the time you're limited to mathematics that ONLY apply to game-specific logic and rendering, etc.

One pretty easy way (well, easier, let's say) to use more advanced math in 3D games is in camera rendering through projection matrices, view pointers, eye points from field-of-view projections, and vertex model space positioned by "world space" or matrices(you can think of the 3D land as world space, and many programmers differentiate "object space" from the world, specifically for models and the like).

#3Pointer2APointer

Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:40 AM

How much math do I need to use quantum entanglement theories?

Basically, how much math you need depends on what exactly you do, and how you implement it.

If you want the truth to be told, to go bare-bones and even make a crappy 3-D game yourself, you will have to understand some forms of math.

These can include, but are not limited to:

1.Geometric math.

2.Physics.

3.Vector graphics(pretty much Geometry again).

4.Linear Algebra(stress to say it, but yes, it helps a lot).

Honestly, you don't have to be a math genius, but application of it will be unavoidable at some point(usually the beginning).

The good thing is Geometry, shapes, etc. All that stuff is what little kids/toddlers learn. Math is used everyday for some reason, even if it's just basic arithmetic. Math is shoved in all of our brains, so it's not some "foreign" language you need to newly understand.

Sure, it gets complicated, but most of the time you're limited to mathematics that ONLY apply to game-specific logic and rendering, etc.

One pretty easy way (well, easier, let's say) to use more advanced math in 3D games is in camera rendering through projection matrices, view pointers, eye points from field-of-view projections, and vertex model space positioned by "world space" or matrices(you can think of the 3D land as world space, and many programmers differentiate "object space" from the world, specifically for models and the like).

#2Pointer2APointer

Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:40 AM

How much math do I need to use quantum entanglement theories?

Basically, how much math you need depends on what exactly you do, and how you implement it.

If you want the truth to be told, to go bare-bones and even make a crappy 3-D game yourself, you will have to understand some forms of math.

These can include, but are not limited to:

1.Geometric math.

2.Physics.

3.Vector graphics(pretty much Geometry again).

4.Linear Algebra(stress to say it, but yes, it helps a lot).

Honestly, you don't have to be a math genius, but application of it will be unavoidable at some point(usually the beginning).

The good thing is Geometry, shapes, etc. All that stuff is what little kids/toddlers learn. Math is used everyday for some reason, even if it's just basic arithmetic. Math is shoved in all of our brains, so it's not some "foreign" language you need to newly understand.

Sure, it gets complicated, but most of the time you're limited to mathematics that ONLY apply to game-specific logic and rendering, etc.

One pretty easy way (well, easier, let's say) to use more advanced math in 3D games is in camera rendering through projection matrices, view pointers, eye points from field-of-view projections, and vertex model space positioned by "world space" or matrices(you can think of the 3D land as world space, and many programmers differentiate "object space" from the world, specifically for models and the like).

#1Pointer2APointer

Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:39 AM

How much math do I need to use quantum entanglement theories?

Basically, how much math you need depends on what exactly you do, and how you implement it.

If you want the truth to be told, to go bare-bones and even make a crappy 3-D game yourself, you will have to understand some forms of math.

These can include, but are not limited to:

1.Geometric math.

2.Physics.

3.Vector graphics(pretty much Geometry again).

4.Linear Algebra(stress to say it, but yes, it helps a lot).

Honestly, you don't have to be a math genius, but application of it will be unavoidable at some point(usually the beginning).

The good thing is Geometry, shapes, etc. All that stuff is what little kids/toddlers learn. Math is used everyday for some reason, even if it's just basic arithmetic. Math is shoved in all of our brains, so it's not some "foreign" language you need to newly understand.

Sure, it gets complicated, but most of the time you're limited to mathematics that ONLY apply to game-specific logic.

One pretty easy way (well, easier, let's say) to use more advanced math in 3D games is in camera rendering through projection matrices, view pointers, eye points from field-of-view projections, and vertex model space positioned by "world space" or matrices(you can think of the 3D land as world space, and many programmers differentiate "object space" from the world, specifically for models and the like).

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