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#Actualdemonkoryu

Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:21 AM

The problem with planning ahead is that only experience can give enough information to plan a software design properly. So, in a domain where you have good experience (i.e. many completed programs), you might plan ahead and be mostly right.

Myself, I find that minimal planning and then refactoring as I progress gives me the best results. Refactoring is especially valuable in retrospective to crystallize the real meaning of your code; in contrast to the mess that code can be when you just got it running for the first time. ;)

#2demonkoryu

Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:18 AM

The problem with planning ahead is that only experience can give enough information to plan a software design properly. So, in a domain where you have good experience (i.e. many completed programs), you might plan ahead and be mostly right.

Myself, I find that minimal planning and then refactoring as I progress gives me the best results. Refactoring is especially valuable in retrospective to crystallize the real meaning of your code; in contrast to the mess that code can be when you just got it running for the first time. ;)

#1demonkoryu

Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:18 AM

The problem with planning is that only experience can give enough information to plan a software design properly. So, in a domain where you have good experience (i.e. many completed programs), you might plan ahead and be mostly right.

Myself, I find that minimal planning and then refactoring as I progress gives me the best results. Refactoring is especially valuable in retrospective to crystallize the real meaning of your code; in contrast to the mess that code can be when you just got it running for the first time. ;)

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