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#ActualDaveTroyer

Posted 04 October 2012 - 01:15 PM

Everything you can. Learn everything that you can.

Not just in the process of making the game itself, but art history, theology, mythology, architecture, psychology, music theory, color theory, industrial design, anatomy, physics, chemistry, fluid dynamics. Everything you can.

It may not make sense now, but have you ever played a game where things felt out of place?
Knowing that a poplar tree doesn't belong in an evergreen forest or that early Asian architecture could belong in the Western Siberian Shelf can make a difference in how companies perceive you and will help you create the game you want or explain why you changed something. It'll help you add rhyme and reason to everything that you want to do, and really flesh out the experience for the player, and companies look for that.

Being a director isn't an easy job. Most of the positions in the video game industry aren't very clearly defined and because of that, I suggest that you don't let yourself be easy to define either. Make it so you can fit in as many positions as possible and you'll become a more valuable asset to that company.

So yeah. Learn as much as you can about as many things as you can. Then learn more! Posted Image

Good luck!

Edited for redundancies. - Dave

#2DaveTroyer

Posted 04 October 2012 - 11:43 AM

Everything you can. Learn everything that you can.

Not just in the process of making the game itself, but art history, theology, mythology, architecture, psychology, music theory, color theory, industrial design, anatomy, physics, chemistry, fluid dynamics. Everything you can.

It may not make sense now, but have you ever played a game where things felt out of place?
Knowing that a poplar tree doesn't belong in an evergreen forest or that early Asian architecture could be belong in the Western Siberian Shelf can make a difference in how companies perceive you in the company and will help you create the game you want or explain why you changed something. It'll help you add rhyme and reason to everything that you want to do, and really flesh out the experience for the player, and companies look for that.

Being a director isn't an easy job. Most of the positions in the video game industry aren't very clearly defined and because of that, I suggest that you don't let yourself be easy to define either. Make it so you can fit in as many positions as possible and you'll become a more valuable asset to that company.

So yeah. Learn as much as you can about as many things as you can. Then learn more! Posted Image

Good luck!

#1DaveTroyer

Posted 04 October 2012 - 11:42 AM

Everything you can. Learn everything that you can.

Not just in the process of making the game itself, but art history, theology, mythology, architecture, psychology, music theory, color theory, industrial design, anatomy, physics, chemistry, fluid dynamics. Everything you can.

It may not make sense now, but have you ever played a game where things felt out of place?
Knowing that a poplar tree doesn't belong in an evergreen forest or that early Asian architecture could be belong in the Western Siberian Shelf can make a difference in how companies perceive you in the company and will help you create the game you want or explain why you changed something. It'll help you add ryhme and reason to everything that you want to do, and really flesh out the experience for the player, and companies look for that.

Being a director isn't an easy job. Most of the positions in the video game industry aren't very clearly defined and because of that, I suggest that you don't let yourself be easy to define either. Make it so you can fit in as many positions as possible and you'll become a more valuable asset to that company.

So yeah. Learn as much as you can about as many things as you can. Then learn more! Posted Image

Good luck!

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