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#ActualL. Spiro

Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:12 PM

A general-purpose tool doesn’t actually need to know the baseline or focal-length, since there is a common denominator for both (baseline would be the average distance between human eyes and focal length would be the average depth of the human eyeball, from pupil lens to the central retinal vein).

Of course your results will not be entirely accurate if you do not use the actual terms used during photography, but in most cases photographers try to simulate physical eye conditions so it generally will not be noticeable if you assume these defaults.


L. Spiro

#2L. Spiro

Posted 06 October 2012 - 08:56 AM

A general-purpose tool doesn’t actually need to know the baseline or focal-length, since there is a common denominator for both (baseline would be the average distance between human eyes and focal length would be the average depth of the human eyeball, from pupil lens to the central retinal vein.

Of course your results will not be entirely accurate if you do not use the actual terms used during photography, but in most cases photographers try to simulate physical eye conditions so it generally will not be noticeable if you assume these defaults.


L. Spiro

#1L. Spiro

Posted 06 October 2012 - 08:55 AM

A general-purpose tool doesn’t actually need to know the baseline or focal-length, since there is a common denominator for both (baseline would be the average distance between human eyes and focal length would be the average depth of the human eyeball, from pupil lens to the central retinal vein.

Of course your results will not be entirely accurate if you do not use the actual terms used during photography, but in most cases photographers tries to simulate physical eye conditions so it generally will not be noticeable if you assume these defaults.


L. Spiro

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