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#Actualjbadams

Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:42 AM

1. What would be a good language that fits the above critirea?

Python would be an excellent choice. It is generally considered to be easier to learn than C++, but is a very capable and expressive language that sees a extensive professional use both in and out of games development. It can also be extended with C or C++ (for performance reasons or to gain access to an existing library) relatively easily, or can be embedded in a C++ program as a scripting language. There are plenty of resources for learning the language and a selection of libraries for games development. Python has been used in Eve Online and Civilization 4 amongst others.

You might also consider Lua, which is also a popular and performant scripting language in the games industry but can also be used stand-alone to create games. You could use LOVE to create 2d games in Lua. The advantages are very similar to those offered by Python.

C# is also a popular choice.


2. Which would be easier for beginners 2d or 3d games?

In depends on your selection of language, libraries and engines. A beginner using Unity might find 3d more approachable than 2d thanks to the functionality provided. Generally however, 2d is usually considered to be more approachable and achievable unless you're using a tool-set that makes 3d the better option.

2d would be more approachable with either Python or Lua.


3. Is it wise to go the "easy route" first?

I think it's a great idea to learn a language like Python before -- or simply instead of -- C++. By choosing a language with less complications and a shorter learning curve you can focus more on the basics of programming itself rather than getting caught up with the many exceptions and corner cases a language like C++ presents. Depending on your goals you may even discover you don't actually need C++ at all, but you'll find it much easier to pick up if you're just learning the specifics of the language rather than programming as well.

Not everyone agrees with this opinion, but I expect you'll be hard pressed to find anyone who would suggest that learning a language such as Python would set you back or make learning C++ any more difficult -- it's certainly not wasted time to learn a different language; especially a popular one like Python or Lua. Skilled professional developers know a range of different languages, and there's no reason you shouldn't start off with one that will allow you to see some faster results.


Hope that helps! Posted Image

#1jbadams

Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:42 AM

1. What would be a good language that fits the above critirea?

Python would be an excellent choice. It is generally considered to be easier to learn than C++, but is a very capable and expressive language that sees a extensive professional use both in and out of games development. It can also be extended with C or C++ (for performance reasons or to gain access to an existing library) relatively easily, or can be embedded in a C++ program as a scripting language. There are plenty of resources for learning the language and a selection of libraries for games development. Python has been used in Eve Online and Civilization 4 amongst others.

You might also consider Lua, which is also a popular and performant scripting language in the games industry but can also be used stand-alone to create games. You could use LOVE to create 2d games in Lua.

C# is also a popular choice.


2. Which would be easier for beginners 2d or 3d games?

In depends on your selection of language, libraries and engines. A beginner using Unity might find 3d more approachable than 2d thanks to the functionality provided. Generally however, 2d is usually considered to be more approachable and achievable unless you're using a tool-set that makes 3d the better option.

2d would be more approachable with either Python or Lua.


3. Is it wise to go the "easy route" first?

I think it's a great idea to learn a language like Python before -- or simply instead of -- C++. By choosing a language with less complications and a shorter learning curve you can focus more on the basics of programming itself rather than getting caught up with the many exceptions and corner cases a language like C++ presents. Depending on your goals you may even discover you don't actually need C++ at all, but you'll find it much easier to pick up if you're just learning the specifics of the language rather than programming as well.

Not everyone agrees with this opinion, but I expect you'll be hard pressed to find anyone who would suggest that learning a language such as Python would set you back or make learning C++ any more difficult -- it's certainly not wasted time to learn a different language; especially a popular one like Python or Lua. Skilled professional developers know a range of different languages, and there's no reason you shouldn't start off with one that will allow you to see some faster results.


Hope that helps! Posted Image

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