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#Actualtom_mai78101

Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:10 AM

For example, I have come across a pretty common (or mediocre) usage of vectors in math. Now, in English, cross product is known as the determinant of square matrices, which isn't used to describe similar a similar value for vectors in a 2D environment. Sometimes, when we want to compare two different frames of reference, and we wanted to know if an object is moving either clockwise, or counter-clockwise, we would have to use the cross product and compare it with something for the result. That "something" is a replacement word for "a vector rotation with a specific direction." We have that word, and hopefully you may know some of those words. (Not intented...)

In Danish, the term tværvector is used as follows:

A tværvector is the rotation of a 2D vector 90 degrees counter-clockwise.


Ok, maybe we do have a terminology for that, but in a general form (Source, I believed): The direction of a 90-degrees counterclockwise vector rotation.

Now, expanding outwards away from mathematical terms/linguistics, there are plenty of terms that shortens some English words. I wondered if we are allowed to "invent" new terms, or "borrow" terms from other languages and incorporated them into daily usage? Or maybe even claim a "borrowed" word as our own...

And probably learn something new in this thread. Posted Image

#5tom_mai78101

Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:09 AM

For example, I have come across a pretty common (or mediocre) usage of vectors in math. Now, in English, cross product is known as the determinant of square matrices, which isn't used to describe similar a similar value for vectors in a 2D environment. Sometimes, when we want to compare two different frames of reference, and we wanted to know if an object is moving either clockwise, or counter-clockwise, we would have to use the cross product and compare it with something for the result. That "something" is a replacement word for "a vector rotation with a specific direction." We have that word, and hopefully you may know some of those words. (Not intented...)

In Dutch, the term tværvector is used as follows:

A tværvector is the rotation of a 2D vector 90 degrees counter-clockwise.


Ok, maybe we do have a terminology for that, but in a general form (Source, I believed): The direction of a 90-degrees counterclockwise vector rotation.

Now, expanding outwards away from mathematical terms/linguistics, there are plenty of terms that shortens some English words. I wondered if we are allowed to "invent" new terms, or "borrow" terms from other languages and incorporated them into daily usage? Or maybe even claim a "borrowed" word as our own...

And probably learn something new in this thread. Posted Image

#4tom_mai78101

Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:09 AM

For example, I have come across a pretty common (or mediocre) usage of vectors in math. Now, in English, cross product is known as the determinant of square matrices, which isn't used to describe similar a similar value for vectors in a 2D environment. Sometimes, when we want to compare two different frames of reference, and we wanted to know if an object is moving either clockwise, or counter-clockwise, we would have to use the cross product and compare it with something for the result. That "something" is a replacement word for "a vector rotation with a specific direction." We have that word, and hopefully you may know some of those words. (Not intented...)

In Dutch, the term tværvector is used as follows:

A tværvector is the rotation of a 2D vector 90 degrees counter-clockwise.


Ok, maybe we do have a terminology for that, but in a general form (Source, I believed): The direction of a 90-degrees counterclockwise vector rotation.

Now, expanding outwards away from mathematical terms/linguistics, there are plenty of terms that shortens some English words. I wondered if we are allowed to "invent" new terms, or "borrow" terms from other languages and incorporated them into daily usage? Or maybe even claim a a "borrowed" word as our own...

And probably learn something new in this thread. Posted Image

#3tom_mai78101

Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:07 AM

For example, I have come across a pretty common (or mediocre) usage of vectors in math. Now, in English, cross product is known as the determinant of square matrices, which isn't used to describe similar a similar value for vectors in a 2D environment. Sometimes, when we want to compare two different frames of reference, and we wanted to know if an object is moving either clockwise, or counter-clockwise, we would have to use the cross product and compare it with something for the result. That "something" is a replacement word for "a vector rotation with a specific direction." We have that word, and hopefully you may know some of those words. (Not intented...)

In Dutch, the term tværvector is used as follows:

A tværvector is the rotation of a 2D vector 90 degrees counter-clockwise.


Ok, maybe we do have a terminology for that, but in a general form (Source, I believed): The direction of a 90-degrees counterclockwise vector rotation.

Now, expanding outwards away from mathematical terms/linguistics, there are plenty of terms that shortens some English words. I wondered if we are allowed to "invent" new terms, or "borrow" terms from other languages and incorporated them into daily usage?

And probably learn something new in this thread. Posted Image

#2tom_mai78101

Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:07 AM

For example, I have come across a pretty common (or mediocre) usage of vectors in math. Now, in English, cross product is known as the determinant of square matrices, which isn't used to describe similar a similar value for vectors in a 2D environment. Sometimes, when we want to compare two different frames of reference, and we wanted to know if an object is moving either clockwise, or counter-clockwise, we would have to use the cross product and compare it with something for the result. That "something" is a replacement word for "a vector rotation with a specific direction." We have that word, and hopefully you know some of those words. (Not intented...)

In Dutch, the term tværvector is used as follows:

A tværvector is the rotation of a 2D vector 90 degrees counter-clockwise.


Ok, maybe we do have a terminology for that, but in a general form (Source, I believed): The direction of a 90-degrees counterclockwise vector rotation.

Now, expanding outwards away from mathematical terms/linguistics, there are plenty of terms that shortens some English words. I wondered if we are allowed to "invent" new terms, or "borrow" terms from other languages and incorporated them into daily usage?

And probably learn something new in this thread. Posted Image

#1tom_mai78101

Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:04 AM

For example, I have come across a pretty common (or mediocre) usage of vectors in math. Now, in English, cross product is known as the determinant of square matrices, which isn't used to describe similar a similar value for vectors in a 2D environment.

In Dutch, the term tværvector is used as follows:

A tværvector is the rotation of a 2D vector 90 degrees counter-clockwise.


Ok, maybe we do have a terminology for that, but in a general form (Source, I believed): The direction of a 90-degrees counterclockwise vector rotation.

Now, expanding outwards away from mathematical terms/linguistics, there are plenty of terms that shortens some English words. I wondered if we are allowed to "invent" new terms, or "borrow" terms from other languages and incorporated them into daily usage?

And probably learn something new in this thread. :D

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