Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:19 AM

Sorry another little bit:

When I decided to make Madsen Studios my full time gig, I did a bunch of big and small things to make it feel official. I got a new logo, new business cards, shirts, etc. I keep regular business hours, like a job. Drafted up official looking contracts, invoices and form letters all using a waterprint of my logo. I also completely redid my accounting methods. All of this combined made me feel more legit, even if I was just starting out. It helped give me a bit more confidence when talking to potential clients. My father once said "...you want to start a business, then treat it like a job." I guarantee everyone, the moment you start charging for your services, you'll feel more serious. More legit. Now, you might temporarly lose all of your freebie clients and have no work for a little bit but that first paid job that you land will feel that much better! Plus you'll know you're on your way to making this your living.

Because at the end of the day, most people here want to make game audio their living instead of their hobby. Something to consider.

Side note: This industry is feast or famine by it's very nature. So having a few dry spells is normal. However if you find yourself going on 6 months with absolutely zero work, it's time to reconsider how you're marketing yourself. Is your music up to par? Are you marketing to the right kind(s) of clients? Are you spamming people too much? Etc. Find some successful composers/audio folks you respect and study how they're marketing themselves. Maybe even ask for advice! (Most people are very willing to help out.)

#3nsmadsen

Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:18 AM

Sorry another little bit:

When I decided to make Madsen Studios my full time gig, I did a bunch of big and small things to make it feel official. I got a new logo, new business cards, shirts, etc. I keep regular business hours, like a job. Drafted up official looking contracts, invoices and form letters all using a waterprint of my logo. I also completely redid my accounting methods. All of this combined made me feel more legit, even if I was just starting out. It helped give me a bit more confidence when talking to potential clients. My father once said "...you want to start a business, then treat it like a job." I guarantee everyone, the moment you start charging for your services, you'll feel more serious. More legit. Now, you might temporarly lose all of your freebie clients and have no work for a little bit but that first paid job that you land will feel that much better! Plus you'll know you're on your way to making this your living.

Because at the end of the day, most people here want to make game audio their living instead of their hobby. Something to consider.

Side note: This industry is feast or famine by it's very nature. So having a few dry spells is normal. However if you find yourself going on 6 months with absolutely zero work, it's time to reconsider how you're marketing yourself. Is your music up to par? Are you marketing the right kind(s) of clients? Are you spamming people too much? Etc. Find some successful composers/audio folks you respect and study how they're marketing themselves. Maybe even ask for advice! (Most people are very willing to help out.)

#2nsmadsen

Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:17 AM

Sorry another little bit:

When I decided to make Madsen Studios my full time gig, I did a bunch of big and small things to make it feel official. I got a new logo, new business cards, shirts, etc. I keep regular business hours, like a job. Drafted up official looking contracts, invoices and form letters all using a waterprint of my logo. I also completely redid my accounting methods. All of this combined made me feel more legit, even if I was just starting out. It helped give me a bit more confidence when talking to potential clients. My father once said "...you want to start a business, then treat it like a job." I guarantee everyone, the moment you start charging for your services, you'll feel more serious. Now, you might temporarly lose all of your freebie clients and have no work for a little bit but that first paid job that you land will feel that much better! Plus you'll know you're on your way to making this your living.

Because at the end of the day, most people here want to make game audio their living instead of their hobby. Something to consider.

Side note: This industry is feast or famine by it's very nature. So having a few dry spells is normal. However if you find yourself going on 6 months with absolutely zero work, it's time to reconsider how you're marketing yourself. Is your music up to par? Are you marketing the right kind(s) of clients? Are you spamming people too much? Etc. Find some successful composers/audio folks you respect and study how they're marketing themselves. Maybe even ask for advice! (Most people are very willing to help out.)

#1nsmadsen

Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:15 AM

Sorry another little bit:

When I decided to make Madsen Studios my full time gig, I did a bunch of big and small things to make it feel official. I got a logo, new business cards, shirts, etc. I keep regular business hours, like a job. Drafted up official looking contracts, invoices and form letters all using a waterprint of my logo. I also completely redid my accounting methods. All of this combined made me feel more legit, even if I was just starting out. It helped give me a bit more confidence when talking to potential clients. My father once said "...you want to start a business, then treat it like a job." I guarantee everyone, the moment you start charging for your services, you'll feel more serious. Now, you might temporarly lose all of your freebie clients and have no work for a little bit but that first paid job that you land will feel that much better! Plus you'll know you're on your way to making this your living.

Because at the end of the day, most people here want to make game audio their living instead of their hobby. Something to consider.

PARTNERS