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#ActualHodgman

Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:53 PM

The best and worst thing about English is that we just steal everyone else's words whenever we need to.

Great for expressiveness, but bad for spelling rules, where you're not sure if the etymology of a particular word is gaelic or latin or dutch, etc, so you don't know what kind of pronunciation rules to apply to the letters...

If you start using words like Tværvektoren in articles, and it catches on (so other people also start using the word), then eventually dictionary authors will recognise that the word is now in common usage and they'll add it to their dictionaries. At this point, it's pretty much officially an English word.

The best and worst thing about English is that we just steal everyone else's words whenever we need to.

Great for expressiveness, but bad for spelling rules, where you're not sure if the etymology of a particular word is gaelic or latin or dutch, etc, so you don't know what kind of pronunciation rules to apply to the letters...

If you start using words like Tværvektoren in articles, and it catches on ([i]so other people also start using the word[/i]), then eventually dictionary authors will recognise that the word is now in common usage and they'll add it to their dictionaries. At this point, it's pretty much officially an English word.

#1Hodgman

Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:49 PM

The best and worst thing about English is that we just steal everyone else's words whenever we need to.

Great for expressiveness, but bad for spelling rules, where you're not sure if the etymology of a particular word is gaelic or latin or dutch, etc, so you don't know what kind of pronunciation rules to apply to the letters...

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