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#ActualKrohm

Posted 10 October 2012 - 12:57 AM

I strongly advice to not do so at vertex level.
It's worth noticing it is not possible, in a VS to set "each of the 3 vertices to the same position". This is Geometry/Primitive shader capability, for which you could just avoid emitting a primitive to rasterize.
Also note that moving vertices has a consequence on shading and rasterization on all primitives using it.

In the past, I've been moderately successful using height map parametrization to encode hole points. It required some uniforms and I didn't consider it good enough for general use so I didn't invest on it. However, this technique has re-surfaced in L4D2.
I'm currently inclined to use precomputed low-res distance fields instead. But given the availability of large (for my purpose) uniform storage in SM4 and beyound, I guess I won't spend more effort on it.

edit: typo

#1Krohm

Posted 10 October 2012 - 12:56 AM

I strongly advice to do so at vertex level.
It's worth noticing it is not possible, in a VS to set "each of the 3 vertices to the same position". This is Geometry/Primitive shader capability, for which you could just avoid emitting a primitive to rasterize.
Also note that moving vertices has a consequence on shading and rasterization on all primitives using it.

In the past, I've been moderately successful using height map parametrization to encode hole points. It required some uniforms and I didn't consider it good enough for general use so I didn't invest on it. However, this technique has re-surfaced in L4D2.
I'm currently inclined to use precomputed low-res distance fields instead. But given the availability of large (for my purpose) uniform storage in SM4 and beyound, I guess I won't spend more effort on it.

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