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#ActualHeath

Posted 10 October 2012 - 11:40 PM

Really, I don't like it when there is a 20 line piece of code that is available for free, that I then have to bother tracking who created it, and make sure to give them credit for their 1/200000th share of the code in my project. Oftentimes, I find it easier to just to write my own so I don't have to bother with their version. But if they truly want to make something available for use that can fit within a single blog post, or is a single header file, make it public domain or MIT-like.

It's not that I don't want to give credit where credit is due, it's just that for a small chunk of code, it's just not worth the hassle and legal risk if I forget to credit all 30 people that once posted something on some site somewhere that I once used sometime in the past two years in one codebase that now is being used in a new project. It's not just the crediting either - I have to get their licenses, and make sure users can tell license #22 goes to code snippet #22, even though license #22 is the same license as license #15, #17, and #4, and a slightly modified version of license #12 and #14.

Does that really happen to you often? I can't imagine this happening all that often.

In a related note, it's a pain to track down all the licenses for the sound samples maybe-used by the composer who's working for you (quite generously for free! So it's worth the hassle - but it's still a pain), because the composer doesn't fully understand the legal aspect of "free" sound samples downloaded from sites.

Creative Commons Attribution is great! Except for a 1/15th second whistle that's only used once in a 5 minute song.

Sound samples are a mess. Have you seen that "Copyright Criminals" documentary on Netflix? It's interesting, and it covers a lot of the basic problems with owning the rights to sounds, and just how that has affected music since sampling and turn-tables became instruments unto themselves.

#1Heath

Posted 10 October 2012 - 11:37 PM

Really, I don't like it when there is a 20 line piece of code that is available for free, that I then have to bother tracking who created it, and make sure to give them credit for their 1/200000th share of the code in my project. Oftentimes, I find it easier to just to write my own so I don't have to bother with their version. But if they truly want to make something available for use that can fit within a single blog post, or is a single header file, make it public domain or MIT-like.

It's not that I don't want to give credit where credit is due, it's just that for a small chunk of code, it's just not worth the hassle and legal risk if I forget to credit all 30 people that once posted something on some site somewhere that I once used sometime in the past two years in one codebase that now is being used in a new project. It's not just the crediting either - I have to get their licenses, and make sure users can tell license #22 goes to code snippet #22, even though license #22 is the same license as license #15, #17, and #4, and a slightly modified version of license #12 and #14.

Does that really happen to you often? I can't imagine this happening all that often.

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