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#Actual3Ddreamer

Posted 11 October 2012 - 10:57 AM

Well, like I often write to new game developers, any well supported language is just fine for making games. Fantastic games have been made in all of the major ones. Now we are talking game development here, which is a whole coding and software environment added to the making of a game. Another consideration is that you have experience as a software engineer and I assume pretty good with C.

I have done in the last two months a couple hundred hours of research into game development. Let's see if any experts or intermediate experienced people agree with me. It's just a friendly challenge... Posted Image

Galdred, if you are going to stay with making 2D games, then C would be excellent. If you are going to eventually go to 3D, then I would say migrate to C++ or C#. Though C++ is the majority of 3D AAA games being made, many beginner and intermediate 3D games are being made in other languages and a few AAA games in Java, C, or C#, or other. Okay, that stuff is given, too, now.

Looking at the languages themselves, the more complex the game, then in general the more need for object oriented programming for the core and scripting language for game functionality. Right now and in the foreseeable future, both C++ and C# have huge repositories of libraries, many software applications, and large community support. The C++ is much larger in major ways than C#, but C# is evolving to likely close the gap to a great extent in the coming years. We know that C++ will dominate AAA game development for at least several more years and rightfully so for a bunch of reasons, but many less complex games being sold are written in other languages.

Both object oriented and dynamic writing are improved and will continue to be improved in C#. I believe that C# will eventually fade the need for a scripting language for a C# game because of being more programmer friendly and it is evolving.

As for C, it will be a viable language for quality games for many years to come, as I am sure we can agree. I feel that C would be a great language for 2D games. Having experience as a 2D and 3D artist in the industry for more than two years now, I know how art assets effect game performance of high quality ones made in Java and C++. I can assure you that your turn based 2D games can use the advantages of C while not being able to take full advantage of some performance characteristics of C++ an C#, yet not needing them for most 2D games. Once you get large libraries of code and many art assets in a couple years, then performance might get critical - or maybe not.

I am recommending that you stay with C and make full advantage of your experience in the language and software engineering. Stay with it until you complete your tour with 2D game making. After a year or two, if you then decide to start making 3D games or your 2D games have been filled in order to need the extra performance, then consider C++ or C#. (Who knows: Maybe Java or C will be in the league for the highest performaning games again in a few years.)

Get good at 2D game making before you do deep contemplation about a scripting language. That will take you probably several months to a year or more because you will need to learn the art aspects with the programming.

1) Start game making immediately, such as Tic-Tac-Toe, Pong, Tetris, PacMan, Space Invaders, and/or a clone of a contemporary popular one. You need to understand game programming structure more than anything else at this point.

2) Get a general IDE and/ or a language specific game making SDK. Research and decide this while you make your first few games.

3) Until you need to make art or mod existing ones for your games, get involved in artist forums supporting your plans, incuding in this website. Here we have plenty of information in the beginners forum and the artist forums to help you decide on art software and assets, even in the last few days being posted.

4) Eventually you will likely find a community which focuses on the genre of games that you do in your language.


Working hard is something you already do. You get results. My last advice is to remember to enjoy it all! Posted Image


Clinton

#13Ddreamer

Posted 11 October 2012 - 10:44 AM

Well, like I often write to new game developers, any well supported language is just fine for making games. Fantastic games have been made in all of the major ones. Now we are talking game development here, which is a whole coding and software environment added to the making of a game. Another consideration is that you have experience as a software engineer and I assume pretty good with C.

I have done in the last two months a couple hundred hours of research into game development. Let's see if any experts or intermediate experienced people agree with me. It's just a friendly challenge... Posted Image

Galdred, if you are going to stay with making 2D games, then C would be excellent. If you are going to eventually go to 3D, then I would say migrate to C++ or C#. Though C++ is the majority of 3D AAA games being made, many beginner and intermediate 3D games are being made in other languages and a few AAA games in Java, C, or C#, or other. Okay, that stuff is given, too, now.

Looking at the languages themselves, the more complex the game, then in general the more need for object oriented programming for the core and scripting language for game functionality. Right now and in the foreseeable future, both C++ and C# have huge repositories of libraries, many software applications, and large community support. The C++ is much larger in major ways than C#, but C# is evolving to likely close the gap to a great extent in the coming years. We know that C++ will dominate AAA game development for at least several more years and rightfully so for a bunch of reasons, but many less complex games being sold are written in other languages.

Both object oriented and dynamic writing are improved and will continue to be improved in C#. I believe that C# will eventually fade the need for a scripting language for a C# game because of being more programmer friendly and it is evolving.

As for C, it will be a viable language for quality games for many years to come, as I am sure we can agree. I feel that C would be a great language for 2D games. Having experience as a 2D and 3D artist in the industry for more than two years now, I know how art assets effect game performance of high quality ones made in Java and C++. I can assure you that your turn based 2D games can use the advantages of C while not being able to take full advantage of some performance characteristics of C++ an C#, yet not needing them for most 2D games. Once you get large libraries of code and many art assets in a couple years, then performance might get critical - or maybe not.

I am recommending that you stay with C and make full advantage of your experience in the language and software engineering. Stay with it until you complete your tour with 2D game making. After a year or two, if you then decide to start making 3D games or your 2D games have been filled in order to need the extra performance, then consider C++ or C#. (Who knows: Maybe Java or C will be in the league for the highest performaning games again in a few years.)

Get good at 2D game making before you do deep comtemplation about a scripting language. That will take you probably several months to a year or more because you will need to learn the art aspects with the programming.

1) Start game making immediately, such as Tic-Tac-Toe, Pong, Tetris, PacMan, Space Invaders, and/or a clone of a contemporary popular one. You need to understand game programming structure more than anything else at this point.

2) Get a general IDE and/ or a language specific game making SDK. Research and decide this while you make your first few games.

3) Until you need to make art or mod existing ones for your games, get involved in artist forums supporting your plans, incuding in this website. Here we have plenty of information in the beginners forum and the artist forums to help you decide on art software and assets, even in the last few days being posted.

4) Eventually you will likely find a community which focuses on the genre of games that you do in your language.


Working hard is something you already do. You get results. My last advice is to remember to enjoy it all! Posted Image


Clinton

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