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#ActualATC

Posted 13 October 2012 - 02:05 PM

Your system sounds pretty good. I can give it my blessings insofar as what I've heard you say about it. But don't think all (or any part of) it is "uncrackable". You might have made it hard enough that I don't feel like trying, but anything is breakable. When you engineer the "unbreakable" lock I will just get a screwdriver and take the door off the hinges... the mighty lock falling at my feet as I enter the bank vault. That's how hacking is done and how crackers think. :-)

However, I still take issue with the claim that this will "increase revenues"... I say again that people who refuse to pay for your software are not going to pay for your software. Thinking otherwise is being completely unrealistic and/or naive. No one thinks "Gee, I like that game. Let me go online and try to get a cracked version. If I can't then I'll go to Gamestop and buy it." Their thoughts either go one way or the other: "I'm going to Gamestop to buy that game," or "I'm going to crack that game and play for free." I'm sure there are a few people who might go and buy it after failing to crack it, but those people probably don't count for 1 in 1000 buyers. People who are determined enough not to pay that they will crack your game and use it illegally are just going to keep trying to crack it or just wait until someone else figures out how to do; which usually doesn't take very long. The only way you're going to increase revenues is by writing excellent games and software. That's what compels people to buy; not DRM or security.

"Anti-cracking" measures and security should be about keeping things fair. It's not fair to paying customers if everyone and his uncle gets to play for free. And that's really, imho, the only reason to have any DRM/security measures in your game. The way to discourage people from cracking your software is by pricing it fairly, offering good customer service, treating your customers with respect and making your games accessible to the public.

Regards,

--ATC--

P.S. -- Your security scheme sounds very familiar. It sounds a lot like the security system built into GROME (my favorite terrain/world editing tool) from Quad Software. I notice your company is called "Quadisys" which sounds similar to "Quad"... Are you guys an offshoot of Quad or related in any way? If so, please send Adrian my regards. He has helped me greatly over the years! ;-)

#2ATC

Posted 13 October 2012 - 02:03 PM

Your system sounds pretty good. I can give it my blessings insofar as what I've heard you say about it. But don't think all (or any part of) it is "uncrackable". You might have made it hard enough that I don't feel like trying, but anything is breakable. When you engineer the "unbreakable" lock I will just get a screwdriver and take the door off the hinges... the mighty lock falling at my feet as I enter the bank vault. That's how hacking is done and how crackers think. :-)

However, I still take issue with the claim that this will "increase revenues"... I say again that people who refuse to pay for your software are not going to pay for your software. Thinking otherwise is being completely unrealistic and/or naive. No one thinks "Gee, I like that game. Let me go online and try to get a cracked version. If I can't then I'll go to Gamestop and buy it." Their thoughts either go one way or the other: "I'm going to Gamestop to buy that game," or "I'm going to crack that game and play for free." I'm sure there are a few people who might go and buy it after failing to crack it, but those people probably don't count for 1 in 1000 buyers. People who are determined enough not to pay that they will crack your game and use it illegally are just going to keep trying to crack it or just wait until someone else figures out how to do; which usually doesn't take very long. The only way you're going to increase revenues is by writing excellent games and software. That's what compels people to buy; not DRM or security.

"Anti-cracking" measures and security should be about keeping things fair. It's not fair to paying customers if everyone and his uncle gets to play for free. And that's really, imho, the only reason to have any DRM/security measures in your game. The way to discourage people from cracking your software is by pricing it fairly, offering good customer service, treating your customers with respect and making your games accessible to the public.

Regards,

--ATC--

#1ATC

Posted 13 October 2012 - 02:00 PM

Your system sounds pretty good. I can give it my blessings insofar as what I've heard you say about it. But don't think all (or any part of) it is "uncrackable". You might have made it hard enough that I don't feel like trying, but anything is breakable. When you engineer the "unbreakable" lock I will just get a screwdriver and take the door off the hinges... the mighty lock falling at my feet as I enter the bank vault. That's how hacking is done and how crackers think. :-)

However, I still take issue with the claim that this will "increase revenues"... I say again that people who refuse to pay for your software are not going to pay for your software. Thinking otherwise is being completely unrealistic and/or naive. No one thinks "Gee, I like that game. Let me go online and try to get a cracked version. If I can't then I'll go to Gamestop and buy it." Their thoughts either go one way or the other: "I'm going to Gamestop to buy that game," or "I'm going to crack that game and play for free." I'm sure there are a few people who might go and buy it after failing to crack it, but those people probably don't count for 1 in 1000 buyers. People who are determined enough not to pay that they will crack your game and use it illegally are just going to keep trying to crack it or just wait until someone else figures out how to do; which usually doesn't take very long. The only way you're going to increase revenues is by writing excellent games and software. That's what compels people to buy; not DRM or security.

Regards,

--ATC--

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