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#ActualSimonForsman

Posted 15 October 2012 - 04:24 AM

Yes, you can become a professional after learning at home, getting your first job without a degree will be significantly harder than getting it with a degree though.

The hard part when applying for the first job is always to get to an interview (if you know what you're doing and manage to get to an interview it is fairly easy, most people suck even though they have a degree). Applying at smaller companies or getting connections in the industry will help you get past the initial screening (Which is where a degree matters most)

You shouldn't choose university based on what languages they are using, Few CS educations use C++ since it is a shitty language to use in education, most CS and SE concepts are far easier to teach (and learn) using other, more specialized languages, (Normally they don't teach languages at all, they might use a language to demonstrate concepts though), at my first year in uni we had to use Java(OOP), StandardML(functional programming), C(Systems programming) and Prolog(logic) and in some classes(Datastructures and algorithms for example) we could choose between Java, C and C++ for our assignments. (We never had a class that required C++ though), we were expected to pick new languages up as we went along. (For the systems programming class we got a 2 hour introduction to C and then it was all about pipes, processes, semaphores, etc and it was up to us to figure the language out)

Also, you shouldn't restrict yourself to a single language, you will become a far better programmer if you pick up a few different ones. (Personally i wouldn't hire a programmer who only knew C++ even if it was the only language we used in production)

#2SimonForsman

Posted 15 October 2012 - 04:24 AM

Yes, you can become a professional after learning at home, getting your first job without a degree will be significantly harder than getting it with a degree though.

The hard part when applying for the first job is always to get to an interview (if you know what you're doing and manage to get to an interview it is fairly easy, most people suck even though they have a degree). Applying at smaller companies or getting connections in the industry will help you get past the initial screening (Which is where a degree matters most)

You shouldn't choose university based on what languages they are using, Few CS educations use C++ since it is a shitty language to use in education, most CS and SE concepts are far easier to teach (and learn) using other, more specialized languages, (Normally they don't teach languages at all, they might use a language to demonstrate concepts though), at my first year in uni we had to use Java(OOP), StandardML(functional programming), C(Systems programming) and Prolog(logic) and in one class(Datastructures and algorithms) we could choose between Java, C and C++ for our assignments. (We never had a class that required C++ though), we were expected to pick new languages up as we went along. (For the systems programming class we got a 2 hour introduction to C and then it was all about pipes, processes, semaphores, etc and it was up to us to figure the language out)

Also, you shouldn't restrict yourself to a single language, you will become a far better programmer if you pick up a few different ones. (Personally i wouldn't hire a programmer who only knew C++ even if it was the only language we used in production)

#1SimonForsman

Posted 15 October 2012 - 04:18 AM

Yes, you can become a professional after learning at home, getting your first job without a degree will be significantly harder than getting it with a degree though.

The hard part when applying for the first job is always to get to an interview (if you know what you're doing and manage to get to an interview it is fairly easy, most people suck even though they have a degree).

You shouldn't choose university based on what languages they are using, Few CS educations use C++ since it is a shitty language to use in education, most CS and SE concepts are far easier to teach (and learn) using other, more specialized languages, (Normally they don't teach languages at all, they might use a language to demonstrate concepts though)

Also, you shouldn't restrict yourself to a single language, you will become a far better programmer if you pick up a few different ones. (Personally i wouldn't hire a programmer who only knew C++ even if it was the only language we used in production)

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