Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#ActualTheChubu

Posted 15 October 2012 - 07:28 AM

Like a guy who gave us a talk about entering the software development industry "Languages can be learnt easily but programming concepts, that's a different story...".

Point is, programming language is a tool, like Photoshop for a graphic designer or AutoCAD for an architect. But you don't see any architect saying "Oh man, in uni they teach us all these weird math but no AutoCAD at all!" (and if you do, I wouldn't trust him a building if I was you).

Programming concepts like algorithms, paradigms, structures, design patterns, etc are (almost) the same for all languages. In uni (well, in some of them at least), the point is not to learn Java, C# or 8086 assembly, the point is learn to be a programmer. You'll have sometimes to play different roles like web designer, project manager or micro-controller programmer, and learn the kind of things that those people deal with. Maybe low-level coding for ARM architectures is your thing and you just don't know it yet!

The idea behind a guy who gets a degree is not that he knows the most used languages but that he knows what developing a piece of software is about. He knows about design, about structure, about how to tackle the problem. So when that dude sits in front of a computer and someone says to him "Code this and that, in C++ please" he, even if he doesn't knows the language perfectly, will write good quality code nevertheless.

Besides, you will learn what "programming" is about in all sort of things, from low level CPU stuff (registers, memory addresses, etc) and operative systems, to high level languages, visual design, web development, data bases and more project management oriented stuff like design patterns or how to handle different people working on the same project.

Some of that will interest you, some of it won't, but that's the price of broadening your knowledge. But I mean, I wouldn't recommend you to go to university if you keep your "I want to learn C++ because that's how games are coded" mindset because you will be frustrated about it, it will seem to you that you're learning nothing useful and you'll be just yearning for a degree and to get the hell out of there. Now, if you go to university for the sake of having knowledge, if you stop measuring things in "how useful they are" categories, you'll learn a lot and you will appreciate things differently.

To me, knowledge for knowledge's sake is fun. I'll never find an use for Intel's 8086 architecture probably, but I enjoyed learning it. Now I'm learning OOP through Java, both things are widely used in the software industry right know and I'm enjoying it too. Even DB programming is fun, though I hope to stay very, very far from a data base in my career.

#1TheChubu

Posted 15 October 2012 - 07:21 AM

Like a guy who gave us a talk about entering the software development industry "Languages can be learnt easily but programming concepts, that's a different story...".

Point is, programming language is a tool, like Photoshop for a graphic designer or AutoCAD for an architect. But you don't see any architect saying "Oh man, in uni they teach us all these weird math but no AutoCAD at all!" (and if you do, I wouldn't trust him a building if I was you).

Programming concepts like algorithms, paradigms, structures, design patterns, etc are (almost) the same for all languages. In uni (well, in some of them at least), the point is not to learn Java, C# or 8086 assembly, the point is learn to be a programmer. You'll have sometimes to play different roles like web designer, project manager or micro-controller programmer, and learn the kind of things that those people deal with. Maybe low-level coding for ARM architectures is your thing and you just don't know it yet!

The idea behind a guy who gets a degree is not that he knows the most used languages but that he knows what developing a piece of software is about. He knows about design, about structure, about how to tackle the problem. So when that dude sits in front of a computer and someone says to him "Code this and that, in C++ please" he, even if he doesn't knows the language perfectly, will write good quality code nevertheless.

Besides, you will learn what "programming" is about in all sort of things, from low level CPU stuff (registers, memory addresses, etc) and operative systems, to high level languages, visual design, web development, data bases and more project management oriented stuff like design patterns or how to handle different people working on the same project.

Some of that will interest you, some of it won't, but that's the price of broadening your knowledge. But I mean, I wouldn't recommend you to go to university if you keep your "I want to learn C++ because that's how games are coded" mindset because you will be frustrated about it, it will seem to you that you're learning nothing useful and you'll be just yearning to get that degree and get the hell out of there. Now, if you go to university for the sake of having knowledge, if you stop measuring things in "how useful they are" categories, you'll learn a lot and you will appreciate things differently.

To me, knowledge for knowledge's sake is fun. I'll never find an use for Intel's 8086 architecture probably, but I enjoyed learning it. Now I'm learning OOP through Java, both things are widely used in the software industry right know and I'm enjoying it too. Even DB programming is fun, though I hope to stay very, very far from a data base in my career.

PARTNERS