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#ActualOrymus3

Posted 15 October 2012 - 12:52 PM

In my own experience, it is extremely fun to work on a very small-scope project. The idea is that you can deliver very quickly something (even if its not so fun). Then, you can just improve it (read, feature creep frenzy) and you learn all-along, while maintaining a product that is always working and can be shown.
You'll notice that a lot of indie developers have their devlogs up showing videos of a game that "always seem to work". The idea is that, much like games like minecraft, they've started with the core basis (I want to be able to move around) and just added stuff.
Needless to say that this helps keep your motivation up as the hurdle to getting "something done" is always very small compared to starting from scratch and making the whole. Sure, you do refactor down the road, and this transitions into loss of time, but you've both learned and had fun, so what's not to like?

As stated above, start with something like pong, make it whole. Once this is done, add more stuff in until it just can't take any more features. Release soon, release often, and keep builds of every release you've made.

Play them one after the other to remember where you're coming from and where you're going.

#1Orymus3

Posted 15 October 2012 - 08:27 AM

In my own experience, it is extremely fun to work on a very small-scope project. The idea is that you can deliver very quickly something (even if its not so fun). Then, you can just improve it (read, feature creep frenzy) and you learn all-along, while maintaining a product that is always working and can be shown.
You'll notice that a lot of indie developers have their devlogs up showing videos of a game that "always seem to work". The idea is that, much like games like minecraft, they've started with the core basis (I want to be able to move around) and just added stuff.

As stated above, start with something like pong, make it whole. Once this is done, add more stuff in until it just can't take any more features. Release soon, release often, and keep builds of every release you've.

Play them one after the other to remember where you're coming from and where you're going.

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