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#ActualEddieV223

Posted 16 October 2012 - 01:17 AM

The biggest problems he will face trying to learn 3d from anything after 9.0c is having to learn shaders from the get go, which you can't do if you don't already know the basics of 3d rendering/math. Especially the math. So how can you write a shader if you don't know vector/matrix math or even a single lighting formula? You're not going to.

Also, as a beginner to 3d rendering do you think he's going to make his own file format write to and load it( and write an exporter to your format from a 3d package), complete with all the data for 3d rendering as a beginner? Not likely.

This is why dx9.0c is better for beginners. You can load a .x file with one function call, and start with fixed function pipeline without having to write a shader just to draw an object. So you can learn the basic's of 3d math/theory with out having to know 3d math/theory in order to get a basic program up and going.

With the same version you can start writing shaders and use them when and where you want and use fixed function where you need to. So you can slowly move into shaders. When you're good enough at that, and think you can write your own file format for 3d meshes, you can work your way up to dx11/12 whatever is the latest.

I'm sure you can find plenty of video tuts and/or books for dx9.0c.
Frank D Luna's book http://www.amazon.co...shader approach

Also check out http://www.3dbuzz.com and http://www.gameinstitute.com

No matter your choice, unless you're some kind of super genius it's going to take some time and a lot of baby steps to reach your goal. It's often suggested that a great way to learn all of this stuff is to work your way through history. Let me explain.

First games were like pong very simple graphics and game play. Then came the 90s when we had nintendo, simple 2d side scrollers and top down 2d games, however game play evolved and we got genres such as rpg's and shooters. They were still rather simple. Then playstation era came along with 3d graphics, the graphics were not amazing, often had blockly characters and bad animations but it worked. Then ps3/360 now we are getting into seriously complex games, true rpgs and first person shooters ect ect... If you notice that graphics complexity grows at a steady rate. As does game play complexity.

If you work your way through this, as a true beginner it will introduce new knowledge at just the right pace. So pick a game on the level of pong for a first game. Then a nintendo type game, then move up to more advanced stuff such as fixed function 3d and so on. If you think you're going to make the next
skyrim or any modern game you are not. If you get skilled and then join a major studio, then you will get to do your part. But these kind of games require teams of hard working professionals. So set a series of goals that you can actually complete, leading to your eventual goal.

If you already know 3d/math theory and are a competent c++ programmer I would completely suggest the latest dx11/12, but that's not the case, or is it?

Ps Skyrim is dx9.0c

#4EddieV223

Posted 15 October 2012 - 10:53 PM

The biggest problems he will face trying to learn 3d from anything after 9.0c is having to learn shaders from the get go, which you can't do if you don't already know the basics of 3d rendering/math. Especially the math. So how can you write a shader if you don't know vector/matrix math or even a single lighting formula? You're not going to.

Also, as a beginner to 3d rendering do you think he's going to make his own file format write to and load it( and write an exporter to your format from a 3d package), complete with all the data for 3d rendering as a beginner? Not likely.

This is why dx9.0c is better for beginners. You can load a .x file with one function call, and start with fixed function pipeline without having to write a shader just to draw an object. So you can learn the basic's of 3d math/theory with out having to know 3d math/theory in order to get a basic program up and going.

With the same version you can start writing shaders and use them when and where you want and use fixed function where you need to. So you can slowly move into shaders. When you're good enough at that, and think you can write your own file format for 3d meshes, you can work your way up to dx11/12 whatever is the latest.

I'm sure you can find plenty of video tuts and/or books for dx9.0c.
Frank D Luna's book http://www.amazon.co...shader approach

Also check out http://www.3dbuzz.com and http://www.gameinstitute.com

No matter your choice, unless you're some kind of super genius it's going to take some time and a lot of baby steps to reach your goal. It's often suggested that a great way to learn all of this stuff is to work your way through history. Let me explain.

First games were like pong very simple graphics and game play. Then came the 90s when we had nintendo, simple 2d side scrollers and top down 2d games, however game play evolved and we got genres such as rpg's and shooters. They were still rather simple. Then playstation came along with 3d graphics, the graphics were not amazing, often had blockly characters and bad animations but it worked. Then ps2/ps3 now we are getting into seriously complex games, true rpgs and first person shooters ect ect... If you notice that graphics complexity grows at a steady rate.

If you work your way through this, as a true beginner it will introduce new knowledge at just the right pace. So pick a game on the level of pong for a first game. Then a nintendo type game, then move up to more advanced stuff such as fixed function 3d and so on. If you think you're going to make the next
skyrim or any modern game you are not. If you get skilled and then join a major studio, then you will get to do your part. But these kind of games require teams of hard working professionals. So set a series of goals that you can actually complete, leading to your eventual goal.

If you already know 3d/math theory and are a competent c++ programmer I would completely suggest the latest dx11/12, but that's not the case, or is it?

#3EddieV223

Posted 15 October 2012 - 10:53 PM

The biggest problems he will face trying to learn 3d from anything after 9.0c is having to learn shaders from the get go, which you can't do if you don't already know the basics of 3d rendering/math. Especially the math. So how can you write a shader if you don't know vector/matrix math or even a single lighting formula? You're not going to.

Also, as a beginner to 3d rendering do you think he's going to make his own file format write to and load it( and write an exporter to your format from a 3d package), complete with all the data for 3d rendering as a beginner? Not likely.

This is why dx9.0c is better for beginners. You can load a .x file with one function call, and start with fixed function pipeline without having to write a shader just to draw an object. So you can learn the basic's of 3d math/theory with out having to know 3d math/theory in order to get a basic program up and going.

With the same version you can start writing shaders and use them when and where you want and use fixed function where you need to. So you can slowly move into shaders. When you're good enough at that, and think you can write your own file format for 3d meshes, you can work your way up to dx11/12 whatever is the latest.

I'm sure you can find plenty of video tuts and/or books for dx9.0c.
Frank D Luna's book http://www.amazon.co...shader approach

Also check out www.3dbuzz.com and www.gameinstitute.com

No matter your choice, unless you're some kind of super genius it's going to take some time and a lot of baby steps to reach your goal. It's often suggested that a great way to learn all of this stuff is to work your way through history. Let me explain.

First games were like pong very simple graphics and game play. Then came the 90s when we had nintendo, simple 2d side scrollers and top down 2d games, however game play evolved and we got genres such as rpg's and shooters. They were still rather simple. Then playstation came along with 3d graphics, the graphics were not amazing, often had blockly characters and bad animations but it worked. Then ps2/ps3 now we are getting into seriously complex games, true rpgs and first person shooters ect ect... If you notice that graphics complexity grows at a steady rate.

If you work your way through this, as a true beginner it will introduce new knowledge at just the right pace. So pick a game on the level of pong for a first game. Then a nintendo type game, then move up to more advanced stuff such as fixed function 3d and so on. If you think you're going to make the next
skyrim or any modern game you are not. If you get skilled and then join a major studio, then you will get to do your part. But these kind of games require teams of hard working professionals. So set a series of goals that you can actually complete, leading to your eventual goal.

If you already know 3d/math theory and are a competent c++ programmer I would completely suggest the latest dx11/12, but that's not the case, or is it?

#2EddieV223

Posted 15 October 2012 - 10:53 PM

The biggest problems he will face trying to learn 3d from anything after 9.0c is having to learn shaders from the get go, which you can't do if you don't already know the basics of 3d rendering/math. Especially the math. So how can you write a shader if you don't know vector/matrix math or even a single lighting formula? You're not going to.

Also, as a beginner to 3d rendering do you think he's going to make his own file format write to and load it( and write an exporter to your format from a 3d package), complete with all the data for 3d rendering as a beginner? Not likely.

This is why dx9.0c is better for beginners. You can load a .x file with one function call, and start with fixed function pipeline without having to write a shader just to draw an object. So you can learn the basic's of 3d math/theory with out having to know 3d math/theory in order to get a basic program up and going.

With the same version you can start writing shaders and use them when and where you want and use fixed function where you need to. So you can slowly move into shaders. When you're good enough at that, and think you can write your own file format for 3d meshes, you can work your way up to dx11/12 whatever is the latest.

I'm sure you can find plenty of video tuts and/or books for dx9.0c.
Frank D Luna's book http://www.amazon.co...shader approach

Also check out 3dbuzz.com and gameinstitute.com

No matter your choice, unless you're some kind of super genius it's going to take some time and a lot of baby steps to reach your goal. It's often suggested that a great way to learn all of this stuff is to work your way through history. Let me explain.

First games were like pong very simple graphics and game play. Then came the 90s when we had nintendo, simple 2d side scrollers and top down 2d games, however game play evolved and we got genres such as rpg's and shooters. They were still rather simple. Then playstation came along with 3d graphics, the graphics were not amazing, often had blockly characters and bad animations but it worked. Then ps2/ps3 now we are getting into seriously complex games, true rpgs and first person shooters ect ect... If you notice that graphics complexity grows at a steady rate.

If you work your way through this, as a true beginner it will introduce new knowledge at just the right pace. So pick a game on the level of pong for a first game. Then a nintendo type game, then move up to more advanced stuff such as fixed function 3d and so on. If you think you're going to make the next
skyrim or any modern game you are not. If you get skilled and then join a major studio, then you will get to do your part. But these kind of games require teams of hard working professionals. So set a series of goals that you can actually complete, leading to your eventual goal.

If you already know 3d/math theory and are a competent c++ programmer I would completely suggest the latest dx11/12, but that's not the case, or is it?

#1EddieV223

Posted 15 October 2012 - 10:25 PM

The biggest problems he will face trying to learn 3d from anything after 9.0c is having to learn shaders from the get go, which just won't happen if you don't aready know the basics of 3d rendering/math. Especially the math. So how can you write a shader if you don't know vector/matrix math or even a single lighting formula? You're not going to.

Also, as a beginner to 3d rendering do you think he's going to make his own file format and load it, complete with all the understanding of 3d theory as a beginner? Not likely.

This is why dx9.0c is better for beginners. You can load a .x file with one function call, and start with fixed function pipeline without having to write a shader just to draw an object. And learn the basic's of 3d math/theory with out having to know 3d math/theory in order to get a basic program up and going.

The with the same version you can start writing shaders and use them when and where you want and use fixed function where you need to. So you can slowly move into shaders. When your good enough at that, and think you can write your own file format for 3d meshes, you can work your way up to dx11/12 whatever is the latest.

I'm sure you can find plenty of video tuts and/or books for dx9.0c.
Frank D Luna's book http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Game-Programming-Direct-9-0c/dp/1598220160/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350360856&sr=8-1&keywords=a+shader+approach

No matter your choice, unless you're some kind of super genius it's going to take some time and a lot of baby steps to reach your goal. It's often suggested that a great way to learn all of this stuff is to work your way through history. Let me explain.

First games were like pong very simple graphics and game play. Then came the 90s when we had nintendo, simple 2d side scrollers and top down 2d games, however game play evolved and we got genres such as rpg's and shooters. They were still rather simple. Then playstation came along with 3d graphics, the graphics were not amazing, often had blockly characters and bad animations but it worked. Then ps2/ps3 now we are getting into seriously complex games, true rpgs and first person shooters ect ect...

If you work your way through this, as a true beginner it will introduce new knowledge at just the right pace. So pick a game on the level of pong for a first game. Then a nintendo type game, then move up to more advanced stuff such as fixed function 3d and so on. If you think you're going to make the next Oblivion or any modern game you are not. If you get skilled and then join a major studio, then you will get to do your part. But these kind of games require teams of hard working professionals. So set a series of goals that you can actually complete, leading to your eventual goal.

If you already know 3d/math theory and are a competent c++ programmer I would completely suggest the latest dx11/12, but that's not the case, or is it?

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