Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#ActualFantasyVII

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:43 AM

Well the first thing to do is cap the number of frames you show per second, because nobody gets any extra benefit from 2500 fps as opposed to 100 fps, and if you give your (or your player's) graphics card some breathing space it will run cooler and probably live longer.


Yah I know, I'm just doing that to show how much the model decreases my FPS.

The next thing to do is reduce the polygon count. Ideally I wouldn't go for more than 1 million vertices per frame, even with the most efficient state changing systems. 150k poly for a tree (!) is completely ridiculous, and unless its a game about tree surgery, nobody's gonna notice the difference between 150k polys and 8k polys.


Ok I was wrong about one thing. The tree model has 80K polygons and 150K vertices Now your saying that I shouldn't go above one million vertices per frame. well I only have 150K vertices. so I must be doing something wrong?

Finally. The sample XNA draw model code looked terrible when I last saw it a few years ago. Whenever you change the current pixel shader (by changing the effect), the gpu has to finish drawing all models with the current shader before it can change, which causes a delay. The better approach is to draw everything that uses the same shader in one go, then switch to the next shader and repeat, changing the constants/parameters as you go. If you can then reduce the number of changes of texture, it will run even faster.

Lastly, group as many things as possible into one draw call. Nvidia recommends about 300 draw calls per frame in total (this might be a bit out of date though).


How can I do that? Can you direct me to some website that show a better / faster way to render the models?

I'm sorry I just got into 3D like a week ago Posted Image

#5FantasyVII

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:43 AM

Well the first thing to do is cap the number of frames you show per second, because nobody gets any extra benefit from 2500 fps as opposed to 100 fps, and if you give your (or your player's) graphics card some breathing space it will run cooler and probably live longer.


Yah I know, I'm just doing that to show how much the model decreases my FPS.

The next thing to do is reduce the polygon count. Ideally I wouldn't go for more than 1 million vertices per frame, even with the most efficient state changing systems. 150k poly for a tree (!) is completely ridiculous, and unless its a game about tree surgery, nobody's gonna notice the difference between 150k polys and 8k polys.


Ok I was wrong about one thing. The tree model has 80K polygons and 150K vertices Now your saying that I shouldn't go above one million vertices per frame. well I only have 150K vertices. so I must be doing something wrone?

Finally. The sample XNA draw model code looked terrible when I last saw it a few years ago. Whenever you change the current pixel shader (by changing the effect), the gpu has to finish drawing all models with the current shader before it can change, which causes a delay. The better approach is to draw everything that uses the same shader in one go, then switch to the next shader and repeat, changing the constants/parameters as you go. If you can then reduce the number of changes of texture, it will run even faster.

Lastly, group as many things as possible into one draw call. Nvidia recommends about 300 draw calls per frame in total (this might be a bit out of date though).


How can I do that? Can you direct me to some website that show a better / faster way to render the models?

I'm sorry I just got into 3D like a week ago Posted Image

#4FantasyVII

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:40 AM

Well the first thing to do is cap the number of frames you show per second, because nobody gets any extra benefit from 2500 fps as opposed to 100 fps, and if you give your (or your player's) graphics card some breathing space it will run cooler and probably live longer.


Yah I know, I'm just doing that to show how much the model decreases my FPS.

The next thing to do is reduce the polygon count. Ideally I wouldn't go for more than 1 million vertices per frame, even with the most efficient state changing systems. 150k poly for a tree (!) is completely ridiculous, and unless its a game about tree surgery, nobody's gonna notice the difference between 150k polys and 8k polys.


Ok then. you think the tree has more than 1 million vertices?


Finally. The sample XNA draw model code looked terrible when I last saw it a few years ago. Whenever you change the current pixel shader (by changing the effect), the gpu has to finish drawing all models with the current shader before it can change, which causes a delay. The better approach is to draw everything that uses the same shader in one go, then switch to the next shader and repeat, changing the constants/parameters as you go. If you can then reduce the number of changes of texture, it will run even faster.

Lastly, group as many things as possible into one draw call. Nvidia recommends about 300 draw calls per frame in total (this might be a bit out of date though).


How can I do that? Can you direct me to some website that show a better / faster way to render the models?

I'm sorry I just got into 3D like a week ago Posted Image

#3FantasyVII

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:39 AM

Well the first thing to do is cap the number of frames you show per second, because nobody gets any extra benefit from 2500 fps as opposed to 100 fps, and if you give your (or your player's) graphics card some breathing space it will run cooler and probably live longer.


Yah I know, I'm just doing that to show how much the model decreases my FPS.

The next thing to do is reduce the polygon count. Ideally I wouldn't go for more than 1 million vertices per frame, even with the most efficient state changing systems. 150k poly for a tree (!) is completely ridiculous, and unless its a game about tree surgery, nobody's gonna notice the difference between 150k polys and 8k polys.


Ok then. let say the tree is all tangles. so a triangle has 3 vertices. so 150000*3 = 450K vertases. you are saying that at most I should have 1 million vertices per frame. but that is less than half a million and my FPS is around 30.


Finally. The sample XNA draw model code looked terrible when I last saw it a few years ago. Whenever you change the current pixel shader (by changing the effect), the gpu has to finish drawing all models with the current shader before it can change, which causes a delay. The better approach is to draw everything that uses the same shader in one go, then switch to the next shader and repeat, changing the constants/parameters as you go. If you can then reduce the number of changes of texture, it will run even faster.

Lastly, group as many things as possible into one draw call. Nvidia recommends about 300 draw calls per frame in total (this might be a bit out of date though).


How can I do that? Can you direct me to some website that show a better / faster way to render the models?

I'm sorry I just got into 3D like a week ago Posted Image

#2FantasyVII

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:39 AM

Well the first thing to do is cap the number of frames you show per second, because nobody gets any extra benefit from 2500 fps as opposed to 100 fps, and if you give your (or your player's) graphics card some breathing space it will run cooler and probably live longer.


Yah I know, I'm just doing that to show how much the model decreases my FPS.

The next thing to do is reduce the polygon count. Ideally I wouldn't go for more than 1 million vertices per frame, even with the most efficient state changing systems. 150k poly for a tree (!) is completely ridiculous, and unless its a game about tree surgery, nobody's gonna notice the difference between 150k polys and 8k polys.


Ok then. let say the tree is all tangles. so a triangle has 3 vertices. so 150000*3 = 450K vertases. you are saying that at most I should have 1 million vertices per frame. but that is less than half a million and my FPS is around 30 and my GPU usage is 0% and CPU usage is 100%


Finally. The sample XNA draw model code looked terrible when I last saw it a few years ago. Whenever you change the current pixel shader (by changing the effect), the gpu has to finish drawing all models with the current shader before it can change, which causes a delay. The better approach is to draw everything that uses the same shader in one go, then switch to the next shader and repeat, changing the constants/parameters as you go. If you can then reduce the number of changes of texture, it will run even faster.

Lastly, group as many things as possible into one draw call. Nvidia recommends about 300 draw calls per frame in total (this might be a bit out of date though).


How can I do that? Can you direct me to some website that show a better / faster way to render the models?

I'm sorry I just got into 3D like a week ago Posted Image

#1FantasyVII

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:38 AM

Well the first thing to do is cap the number of frames you show per second, because nobody gets any extra benefit from 2500 fps as opposed to 100 fps, and if you give your (or your player's) graphics card some breathing space it will run cooler and probably live longer.


Yah I know, I'm just doing that to show how much the model decreases my FPS.

The next thing to do is reduce the polygon count. Ideally I wouldn't go for more than 1 million vertices per frame, even with the most efficient state changing systems. 150k poly for a tree (!) is completely ridiculous, and unless its a game about tree surgery, nobody's gonna notice the difference between 150k polys and 8k polys.


Ok then. let say the tree is all tangles. so a triangle has 3 vertices. so 150000*3 = 450K vertases. you are saying that at most I should have 1 million vertices per frame. but that is less than half a million and my FPS is around 30 and my GPU usage is 0% and CPU usage is 100%

I just want to know why my CPU is doing all the work and my GPU is just setting there doing nothing?

Finally. The sample XNA draw model code looked terrible when I last saw it a few years ago. Whenever you change the current pixel shader (by changing the effect), the gpu has to finish drawing all models with the current shader before it can change, which causes a delay. The better approach is to draw everything that uses the same shader in one go, then switch to the next shader and repeat, changing the constants/parameters as you go. If you can then reduce the number of changes of texture, it will run even faster.

Lastly, group as many things as possible into one draw call. Nvidia recommends about 300 draw calls per frame in total (this might be a bit out of date though).


How can I do that? Can you direct me to some website that show a better / faster way to render the models?

I'm sorry I just got into 3D like a week ago Posted Image

PARTNERS