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#ActualFrenetic Pony

Posted 18 October 2012 - 03:11 PM

Edited on a day when I can brain again- So I've been thinking, why doesn't Epic (or anyone else using this) just set all materials as emissive, but only tagged for the voxelization?

As in set all materials to emit the same amount of light as you'd want to get from an ambient term. You'd then be cone tracing into a world that's entirely lit. Point being you'd be replacing the ambient term entirely with colored, directional environment light emulating extra bounces everywhere. You'd even get specular off areas not hit by direct light. And it seems like it would all be free if you're already cone tracing everything.

Think of it like the reverse of ambient occlusion. Environment based ambient lighting.

#5Frenetic Pony

Posted 18 October 2012 - 03:11 PM

Edited on a day when I can brain again- So I've been thinking, why doesn't Epic (or anyone else using this) just set all materials as emissive, but only tagged for the voxelization?

As in set all materials to emit the same amount of light as you'd want to get from an ambient term. You'd then be cone tracing into a world that's entirely lit. Point being you'd be replacing the ambient term entirely with colored, directional environment light emulating extra bounces everywhere. You'd even get specular off areas not hit by direct light. And it seems like it would all be free if you're already cone tracing everything.

Think of it like the reverse of ambient occlusion. Environment based ambient lighting.

#4Frenetic Pony

Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:23 PM

So I've been thinking, why doesn't Epic (or anyone else using this) just set all materials with a minimum radiance? (I know there's a better term, my brain's search function isn't working right now).

As in set all materials to emit the same amount of light as they would when receiving the desired ambient term. Or rather, less; as you'd then get more radiating light from the environment. Point being you could replace the ambient term entirely with colored, directional environment light emulating extra bounces everywhere. You'd even get specular off areas not hit by direct light. And it seems like it would all be free if you're already cone tracing everything.

Think of it like the reverse of ambient occlusion. Environment based ambient lighting.

#3Frenetic Pony

Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:21 PM

So I've been thinking, why doesn't Epic (or anyone else using this) just set all materials with a minimum radiance? (I know there's a better term, my brain's search function isn't working right now).

As in set all materials to emit the same amount of light as they would when receiving the desired ambient term. Or rather, less. Point being you could replace the ambient term entirely with colored, directional light emulating say a secondary bounce everywhere. You'd even get specular off areas not hit by direct light. And it seems like it would all be free if you're already cone tracing everything.

#2Frenetic Pony

Posted 17 October 2012 - 03:17 PM

So I've been thinking, why doesn't Epic (or anyone else using this) just set all materials with a minimum radiance? (I know there's a better term, my brain's search function isn't working right now).

As in set all materials to emit the same amount of light as they would when receiving the desired ambient term. You'd then get this injected into the the cone tracing. Secondary color bleed, varying incoming light depending on how dark or light the surroundings are, you'd get specular from surfaces not directly hit by light. Since you're cone tracing it all anyway I can't see that it would add any particular cost, and all of this in exchange for a massive improvement lighting. I can't see that they did this in their "Elemental" demo as there's no mention, and the voxel representation images showed areas not directly hit by light as having no light whatsoever, despite the final image having an ambient term.

#1Frenetic Pony

Posted 17 October 2012 - 03:17 PM

So I've been thinking, why doesn't Epic just set all materials with a minimum radiance? (I know there's a better term, my brain's search function isn't working right now).

As in set all materials to emit the same amount of light as they would when receiving the desired ambient term. You'd then get this injected into the the cone tracing. Secondary color bleed, varying incoming light depending on how dark or light the surroundings are, you'd get specular from surfaces not directly hit by light. Since you're cone tracing it all anyway I can't see that it would add any particular cost, and all of this in exchange for a massive improvement lighting. I can't see that they did this in their "Elemental" demo as there's no mention, and the voxel representation images showed areas not directly hit by light as having no light whatsoever, despite the final image having an ambient term.

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