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#ActualdAND3h

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:48 PM

Just keep it as simple and practical as possible at the beginning. When I did a simple 3D level editor(simple as in 1 weeks work) I made sure It was a completely separate entity to my game. Therefore, the only thing I needed to do was to decide how I was going to store the data, so I could parse it accordingly when my game loads the level. It did however use alot of the code from my game, most notably the render and input code, with modifications to suit the editor;

Because I had such a short amount of time, I decided to limit the artists abilities to just translate,scale and rotate objects. I also decided to leave out the ability to add textures in the editor. I believe as a starting point, this is what you should aim to do.

You would have to make a decision as to whether or not you want to load the models from within the program dynamically, or to load them before hand. Clearly the dynamic option would be more use to the artist, as they wouldn't need you to dig around the code to load another model, but as a start, the pre-load method is adequate.

For ray-casting, you need to make sure you are only casting inside the "viewport" where your scene is being rendered. Otherwise, you will end up with a bogus cast because of the mouse position taking the entire window into account.

#2dAND3h

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:46 PM

Just keep it as simple and practical as possible at the beginning. When I did a simple 3D level editor(simple as in 1 weeks work) I made sure It was a completely separate entity to my game. Therefore, the only thing I needed to do was to decide how I was going to store the data, so I could parse it accordingly when my game loads the level.

Because I had such a short amount of time, I decided to limit the artists abilities to just translate,scale and rotate objects. I also decided to leave out the ability to add textures in the editor. I believe as a starting point, this is what you should aim to do.

You would have to make a decision as to whether or not you want to load the models from within the program dynamically, or to load them before hand. Clearly the dynamic option would be more use to the artist, as they wouldn't need you to dig around the code to load another model, but as a start, the pre-load method is adequate.

For ray-casting, you need to make sure you are only casting inside the "viewport" where your scene is being rendered. Otherwise, you will end up with a bogus cast because of the mouse position taking the entire window into account.

#1dAND3h

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:45 PM

Just keep it as simple and practical as possible at the beginning. When I did a simple 3D level editor(simple as in 1 weeks work) I made sure It was a completely separate entity to my game. Therefore, the only thing I needed to do was to decide how I was going to store the data, so I could parse it accordingly when my game loads the level.

Because I had such a short amount of time, I decided to limit the artists abilities to just move, translate,scale and rotate objects. I also decided to leave out the ability to add textures in the editor. I believe as a starting point, this is what you should aim to do.

You would have to make a decision as to whether or not you want to load the models from within the program dynamically, or to load them before hand. Clearly the dynamic option would be more use to the artist, as they wouldn't need you to dig around the code to load another model, but as a start, the pre-load method is adequate.

For ray-casting, you need to make sure you are only casting inside the "viewport" where your scene is being rendered. Otherwise, you will end up with a bogus cast because of the mouse position taking the entire window into account.

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