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#ActualTom Sloper

Posted 24 October 2012 - 02:15 PM

it says I'm required to complete a summer sketchbook thingy. IS that reall something I have to do as someone who is interested in the software engineering aspect of game development?


What did Digipen say when you asked them this question?


The forum FAQ's entries on game schools still seems very applicable. What about them do you feel is outdated?


1. I just look at the post dates of those articles, and they were written in 1999-2004. Even in the articles themselves, they mention that the industry is rapidly changing, and how instructors constantly have to adapt the curriculum to suit the changing industry.
2. Since these were written right around the very start of the explosion of games into the mainstream market, I assumed many of these points may be have been moot.


1. We would still say that today! We don't know what's going to happen with the coming generation of consoles, how/when the industry is going to go online-only, and so on. The industry is still rapidly changing. A 2012 article would still admit that.
2. By "mainstream market," you mean casual/social games, I take it?

#3Tom Sloper

Posted 24 October 2012 - 02:14 PM

it says I'm required to complete a summer sketchbook thingy. IS that reall something I have to do as someone who is interested in the software engineering aspect of game development?


What did Digipen say when you asked them this question?


The forum FAQ's entries on game schools still seems very applicable. What about them do you feel is outdated?

1. I just look at the post dates of those articles, and they were written in 1999-2004. Even in the articles themselves, they mention that the industry is rapidly changing, and how instructors constantly have to adapt the curriculum to suit the changing industry.
2. Since these were written right around the very start of the explosion of games into the mainstream market, I assumed many of these points may be have been moot.


1. We would still say that today! We don't know what's going to happen with the coming generation of consoles, how/when the industry is going to go online-only, and so on. The industry is still rapidly changing. A 2012 article would still admit that.
2. By "mainstream market," you mean casual/social games, I take it?

#2Tom Sloper

Posted 24 October 2012 - 02:14 PM

it says I'm required to complete a summer sketchbook thingy. IS that reall something I have to do as someone who is interested in the software engineering aspect of game development?


What did Digipen say when you asked them this question?


The forum FAQ's entries on game schools still seems very applicable. What about them do you feel is outdated?

1. I just look at the post dates of those articles, and they were written in 1999-2004. Even in the articles themselves, they mention that the industry is rapidly changing, and how instructors constantly have to adapt the curriculum to suit the changing industry.
2. Since these were written right around the very start of the explosion of games into the mainstream market, I assumed many of these points may be have been moot.


1. We would still say that today! We don't know what's going to happen with the coming generation of consoles, how/when the industry is going to go online-only, and so on. The industry is still rapidly changing. A 2012 article would still admit that.
2. By "mainstream market," you mean casual/social games, I take it?

#1Tom Sloper

Posted 24 October 2012 - 02:13 PM

it says I'm required to complete a summer sketchbook thingy. IS that reall something I have to do as someone who is interested in the software engineering aspect of game development?


What did Digipen say when you asked them this question?


The forum FAQ's entries on game schools still seems very applicable. What about them do you feel is outdated?

1. I just look at the post dates of those articles, and they were written in 1999-2004. Even in the articles themselves, they mention that the industry is rapidly changing, and how instructors constantly have to adapt the curriculum to suit the changing industry.
2. Since these were written right around the very start of the explosion of games into the mainstream market, I assumed many of these points may be have been moot.

1. We would still say that today! We don't know what's going to happen with the coming generation of consoles, how/when the industry is going to go online-only, and so on. The industry is still rapidly changing. A 2012 article would still admit that.
2. By "mainstream market," you mean casual/social games, I take it?

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