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#Actualjbadams

Posted 31 October 2012 - 10:05 PM

Sharing lots of game ideas constantly is not how games get made.

Games get made when a team or individual focus on one idea*, and continue to work at it until it's done. If you have some difficulty that makes it harder for you to stick with and complete a project then you need to find a way of dealing with that and proceeding with your project; it is not the responsibility of others to deal with your problems, and while most people will be sympathetic with your situation, in the real world people won't just jump on board and do things for you because of your difficulty. They're working with their own difficulties -- aspergers and other disorders, health problems, financial problems, and more -- as well, and they have their own ideas they would like to work on as well. They're not "greedy jerks" because of that -- some people are of course, but for the most part everyone else is just busy dealing with their own problems and trying to reach their own goals -- you're not a greedy jerk for not helping all of them!



I have a friend who was terrible at spelling and grammar all through school. There was no structure to what she wrote, punctuation was mis-used or simply left out regularly, the letters were jumbled or completely incorrect, and as a result even though she had very clear hand-writing it was almost impossible to read anything she wrote or typed. Her excuse for this was that she suffers from dyslexia, and all through school the teachers and other students excused her writing because of this problem. In our final year however, the English teacher didn't accept this excuse, telling her she had a known problem and that she needed to work harder to overcome it; some mistakes were expected given her situation, and he would be more lenient than with other students, but she needed to work on producing the best quality work possible.

She got an A for year 12 English, and her writing -- whilst still worse than average -- is now very readable. As it turns out, all she needed to do was work hard at it, and find clever ways of working around her difficulties. All through school everyone excused her bad writing because of the condition, but when she was forced to push her limits she no longer had dyslexia as a crutch and found all sorts of solutions to her difficulties; she practised every day, she came up with clever rhymes to remind her of things, and she made sure she set aside plenty of time to write her assignments so she could do multiple drafts and correct as many of the mistakes as possible.

Don't let people excuse your lack of progress because of your condition -- find ways to get real work done and make real progress in spite of your condition. Find what strengths you have to make up for your weaknesses, and figure out a process that makes use of those strengths and minimises the impact of your weaknesses.


You don't need to continue to advertise many different projects and try to find funds -- you need to pick one project and really focus all of your efforts on it. Right down the idea in detail, look for problems with it and fix them -- then show other people and try to fix the problems they point out.
Try to plan how you can make the project with minimal funding so that you don't need to ask for so much -- perhaps with less levels and a smaller but more varied set of enemies the idea would be more approachable. Maybe you don't need to use the latest and greatest technology if you can get an older (or new but simpler) but sufficiently engine or tool-set that will do the job.
Learn how things are normally done in other teams, and research what is and isn't possible.
Try to learn the skills so that you can do more of the work yourself, and just leave aside the things you can't do -- if you can program but can't create good art, then start programming and just use simple coloured blocks and shapes that can be replaced later.

Get the project really started, and then look for help and/or funding and don't give up till you get it. If people see that you haven't completed other projects, why would they want to contribute money to another one which you might also put aside for a newer idea?


You can succeed, but you need to focus, and apply yourself fully, and you need to do it -- you can't expect other people to do it for you. You can do it! Get out there and don't stop trying till it's done! Posted Image

* It is obviously possible to focus on multiple separate ideas at once and follow them all to fruition, but it'll make the whole process significantly slower.

: Elaboration.


#1jbadams

Posted 31 October 2012 - 10:00 PM

Sharing lots of game ideas constantly is not how games get made.

Games get made when a team or individual focus on one idea*, and continue to work at it until it's done. If you have some difficulty that makes it harder for you to stick with and complete a project then you need to find a way of dealing with that and proceeding with your project; it is not the responsibility of others to deal with your problems, and while most people will be sympathetic with your situation, in the real world people won't just jump on board and do things for you because of your difficulty. They're working with their own difficulties -- aspergers and other disorders, health problems, financial problems, and more -- as well, and they have their own ideas they would like to work on as well.



I have a friend who was terrible at spelling and grammar all through school. There was no structure to what she wrote, punctuation was mis-used or simply left out regularly, the letters were jumbled or completely incorrect, and as a result even though she had very clear hand-writing it was almost impossible to read anything she wrote or typed. Her excuse for this was that she suffers from dyslexia, and all through school the teachers and other students excused her writing because of this problem. In our final year however, the English teacher didn't accept this excuse, telling her she had a known problem and that she needed to work harder to overcome it; some mistakes were expected given her situation, and he would be more lenient than with other students, but she needed to work on producing the best quality work possible.

She got an A for year 12 English, and her writing -- whilst still worse than average -- is now very readable. As it turns out, all she needed to do was work hard at it, and find clever ways of working around her difficulties. All through school everyone excused her bad writing because of the condition, but when she was forced to push her limits she no longer had dyslexia as a crutch and found all sorts of solutions to her difficulties; she practised every day, she came up with clever rhymes to remind her of things, and she made sure she set aside plenty of time to write her assignments so she could do multiple drafts and correct as many of the mistakes as possible.

Don't let people excuse your lack of progress because of your condition -- find ways to get real work done and make real progress in spite of your condition. Find what strengths you have to make up for your weaknesses, and figure out a process that makes use of those strengths and minimises the impact of your weaknesses.


You don't need to continue to advertise many different projects and try to find funds -- you need to pick one project and really focus all of your efforts on it. Right down the idea in detail, look for problems with it and fix them -- then show other people and try to fix the problems they point out.
Try to plan how you can make the project with minimal funding so that you don't need to ask for so much -- perhaps with less levels and a smaller but more varied set of enemies the idea would be more approachable. Maybe you don't need to use the latest and greatest technology if you can get an older (or new but simpler) but sufficiently engine or tool-set that will do the job.
Learn how things are normally done in other teams, and research what is and isn't possible.
Try to learn the skills so that you can do more of the work yourself, and just leave aside the things you can't do -- if you can program but can't create good art, then start programming and just use simple coloured blocks and shapes that can be replaced later.

Get the project really started, and then look for help and/or funding and don't give up till you get it. If people see that you haven't completed other projects, why would they want to contribute money to another one which you might also put aside for a newer idea?


You can succeed, but you need to focus, and apply yourself fully! You can do it!

* It is obviously possible to focus on multiple separate ideas at once and follow them all to fruition, but it'll make the whole process significantly slower.

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