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#Actuallride

Posted 02 November 2012 - 02:56 PM

I taught myself C++ as my first language and I didn't think it was difficult.
If you have a strong desire for C++, go for it. This is why I learned C++ first despite many discourages by peers and I never regret it.

This is the order I think you should learn C++.
  • Learn how to write "Hello, World!"
  • Learn to get user input.
  • Learn all control structure(if-else, while, for) / Learn to write your own functions
  • Learn pointers and arrays(This is the C++ threshold that can be tough for some people. Java, C# and python don't have pointers)
  • and so on..(OOP concepts)
If you cross the threshold, you are fine. However if you think you aren't ready yet, you can consider switching to C# or Java for a period.
The time you've spend C++ won't be a waste because the languages share very similar syntax so you'll pick up very fast.

I read C++ primer plus by stephen prata.This book assumes you have no previous programming experience.

#1lride

Posted 02 November 2012 - 02:43 PM

I taught myself C++ as my first language and I didn't think it was difficult.
If you want to learn C++, go for it.

This is the order I think you should learn C++.
  • Learn how to write "Hello, World!"
  • Learn to get user input.
  • Learn all control structure(if-else, while, for) / Learn to write your own functions
  • Learn pointers and arrays(This is the C++ threshold that can be tough for some people. Java, C# and python don't have pointers)
  • and so on..(OOP concepts)
If you cross the threshold, you are fine. However if you think you aren't ready yet, you can consider switching to C# or Java for a period.
The time you've spend C++ won't be a waste because the languages share very similar syntax so you'll pick up very fast.

I read C++ primer plus by stephen prata. This book assumes you have no previous programming experience.

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