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#Actualjwezorek

Posted 02 November 2012 - 04:34 PM

Hey so I am just getting into programming and I just want to ask a question for you programmers out there.

Do you actually know in your memory what most of your coding you are doing is? Whether it be a big project or anything do you ever have to use a book/google to figure out how to do something?


Well, it's a fact of life that you can only hold so much state regarding code in your head at once. However, for a smallish project that you are writing yourself usually you can hold the whole thing in your head while you develop it unless you step away from it for several months or something. For large projects in which you are not the only programmer involved it's impossible for one person to know the details of the whole thing and you might only have instaneous access in your mind to the details of the module you are working on.

This is the whole point of all the good programming practices that everyone talks about regarding the design and architecture of software. This is the reason why modular design, encapsulation, separation of concerns, et. al. are a good idea. Because if you follow these sorts of design principles it makes it easier to pick up and use someone else's code or code that you wrote two years ago.

As far as looking up stuff in books or online, as you program more you will find yourself needing to look up less stuff regarding the syntax and semantics of your primary programming language, but needing to look up stuff in reference materials about APIs and libraries is pretty much something you will always have to do to some degree.

#2jwezorek

Posted 02 November 2012 - 04:34 PM

Hey so I am just getting into programming and I just want to ask a question for you programmers out there.

Do you actually know in your memory what most of your coding you are doing is? Whether it be a big project or anything do you ever have to use a book/google to figure out how to do something?


Well, it's a fact of life that you can only hold so much state regarding code in your head at once. However, for a smallish project that you are writing yourself usually you can hold the whole thing in your head while you develop it unless you step away from it for several months or something. For large projects in which you are not the only programmer involved it's impossible for one person to know the details of the whole thing and you might only have instaneous access in your mind to the details of the module you are working on.

This is the whole point of all the good programming practices that everyone talks about regarding the design and architecture of software. This is the reason why modular design, encapsulation, separation of concerns, et. al. are a good idea. Because if you follow these sorts of design principles it makes it easier to pick up and use someone else's code or code that you wrote two years ago.

As far as looking up stuff in books or online. As you program more you will find yourself needing to look up less stuff regarding the syntax and semantics of your primary programming language, but needing to look up stuff in reference materials about APIs and libraries is pretty much something you will always have to do to some degree.

#1jwezorek

Posted 02 November 2012 - 04:33 PM

Hey so I am just getting into programming and I just want to ask a question for you programmers out there.

Do you actually know in your memory what most of your coding you are doing is? Whether it be a big project or anything do you ever have to use a book/google to figure out how to do something?


Well, it's a fact of life that you can only hold so much state regarding code in your head at once. However, for a smallish project that you are writing yourself usually you can hold the whole thing in your head while you develop it unless you step away from it for several months or something. For large projects in which you are not the only programmer involved it's impossible for one person to know the details of the whole thing and you might only have instaneous access in your mind to the details of the module you are working on.

This is the whole point of all the good programming practices that everyone talks about regarding the design and architecture of software. This is the reason why modular design, encapsulation, separation of concerns, et. al. are a good idea. Because if you follow these sorts design principles it makes it easier to pick up and use someone else's code or code that you wrote two years ago.

As far as looking up stuff in books or online. As you program more you will find yourself needing to look up less stuff regarding the syntax and semantics of your primary programming language, but needing to look up stuff in reference materials about APIs and libraries is pretty much something you will always have to do to some degree.

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