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#ActualJTippetts

Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:18 PM

Correct, the posted videos probably weren't using physics systems. However, in today's world, 2D physics libraries are an extremely cheap drop-in solution, and you can get such a thing up and running literally in moments. I did a small test using Love2D and Box2D, and got a chain swirling around very much like the one in the second video in about 15 minutes. I can post the code, if you like; it's dead simple. The hard work is done by the physics library, all I had to do was tweak a few parameters.

That being said, you could probably also achieve a similar effect by using "canned" animations, by pre-computing animation tracks for each ball in the chain for a particular movement, especially for the Zelda boss, since there isn't the wavy variation that the second one has. I suspect the second one might be canned, too, since those bullet-hell games tended to be pretty tightly timed and patterned.

#1JTippetts

Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:12 PM

Correct, the posted videos probably weren't using physics systems. However, in today's world, 2D physics libraries are an extremely cheap drop-in solution, and you can get such a thing up and running literally in moments. I did a small test using Love2D and Box2D, and got a chain swirling around very much like the one in the second video in about 15 minutes. I can post the code, if you like; it's dead simple. The hard work is done by the physics library, all I had to do was tweak a few parameters.

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