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#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:13 AM

When I was in-house it was part of my job to implement the audio as much as I could with the available tools. At first our toolset was really limited so there wasn't much I could do but later we pulled in FMOD and things really changed. Also our level editor toolset had matured to a point where we could really add some finesse to the audio. Now that I'm freelancing it varies even more. Sometimes I don't even get to implement any of the audio - I just "throw it over the fence" then try to provide as much feedback during testing as possible.

What I've learned over the years is that each team is very different and the toolsets they have differ too. As much as you can, be involved and have you hand in all things audio. I remember with one team things were so back logged that I actually started editing ActionScript in the front end (title screen, menu, character build, etc) myself. I knew the basic play or stop commands in ActionScript and fiddled my way through the code. I'd get a code review and test everything with someone who actually knew coding before checking it back in. Was that technically part of my job? Nope. But I was tired of waiting for simple hook ups to my sounds and just did it anyway. Plus it was kinda fun.

I'm rambling somewhat but my point here is game development is fluid. Sure you have the job description as it relates to HR and such, but once you're hired on - do EVERYTHING you can to make the audio awesome (and early and under budget if at all possible).

#2nsmadsen

Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:12 AM

When I was in-house it was part of my job to implement the audio as much as I could with the available tools. At first our toolset was really limited so there wasn't much I could do but later we pulled in FMOD and things really changed. Also our level editor toolset had matured to a point where we could really add some finesse to the audio. Now that I'm freelancing it varies even more. Sometimes I don't even get to implement any of the audio - I just "throw it over the fence" then try to provide as much feedback during testing as possible.

What I've learned over the years is that each team is very different and the toolsets they have differ too. As much as you can, be involved and have you hand in all things audio. I remember with one team things were so back logged that I actually started editing ActionScript in the front end (title screen, menu, character build, etc) myself. I knew the basic play or stop commands in ActionScript and fiddled my way through the code. I'd get a code review and test everything with someone who actually knew coding before checking it back in. Was that technically part of my job? Nope. But I was tired of waiting for simple hook ups to my sounds and just did it anyway. Plus it was kinda fun.

I'm rambling somewhat but my point here is game development is fluid. Sure you have the job description as it relates to HR and such, but once you're hired on - do EVERYTHING you can to make the audio awesome (and early and under budget if at all possible).

#1nsmadsen

Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:12 AM

When I was in-house it was part of my job to implement the audio as much as I could with the available tools. At first our toolset was really limited so there wasn't much I could do but later we pulled in FMOD and things really changed. Also our level editor toolset had matured to a point where we could really add some finesse to the audio.

What I've learned over the years is that each team is very different and the toolsets they have differ too. As much as you can, be involved and have you hand in all things audio. I remember with one team things were so back logged that I actually started editing ActionScript in the front end (title screen, menu, character build, etc) myself. I knew the basic play or stop commands in ActionScript and fiddled my way through the code. I'd get a code review and test everything with someone who actually knew coding before checking it back in. Was that technically part of my job? Nope. But I was tired of waiting for simple hook ups to my sounds and just did it anyway. Plus it was kinda fun.

I'm rambling somewhat but my point here is game development is fluid. Sure you have the job description as it relates to HR and such, but once you're hired on - do EVERYTHING you can to make the audio awesome (and early and under budget if at all possible).

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