Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#Actualpondwater

Posted 17 November 2012 - 02:33 PM

Here is the link you were talking about:

http://www.wazim.com..._Tutorial_1.htm

In any case, you want to have some sort of asset conditioning pipeline where you take in an interchange format like .dae and bring it into your own runtime format for your game/engine. How your engine manages its content at runtime is another story.

I attempted to go the approach you did and write my own collada parser. I got it working, but it wasn't robust at all. I find the incredible amount of a variance in the .dae format extremely frustrating and ended up switching to using Assimp for my .dae models. It is great. Nice clean interface, very robust, and much faster than my own parser for optimizing vertex indices. I'd recommend attempting to roll your own like I did, once you get it working for just 1 instance of the .dae format you will understand the format so much more and will feel more comfortable transitioning to Assimp.

Here is a fantastic tutorial if you decide to switch to Assimp:

http://ogldev.atspac...tutorial38.html

It also teaches you how to skin on the GPU, instead of the CPU like wazim's.

#1pondwater

Posted 17 November 2012 - 02:31 PM

Here is the link you were talking about:

http://www.wazim.com/Collada_Tutorial_1.htm

In any case, you want to have some sort of asset conditioning pipeline where you take in an interchange format like .dae and bring it into your own runtime format for your game/engine. How your engine manages its content at runtime is another story.

I attempted to go the approach you did and write my own collada parser. I got it working, but it wasn't robust at all. I find the incredible amount of a variance in the .dae format extremely frustrating and ended up switching to using Assimp for my .dae models. It is great. Nice clean interface, very robust, and much faster than my own parser for optimizing vertex indices. I'd recommend attempting to roll your own like I did, once you get it working for just 1 instance of the .dae format you will understand the format so much more and will feel more comfortable transitioning to Assimp.

Here is a tutorial to get you started with animation using assimp and opengl:

http://ogldev.atspace.co.uk/www/tutorial38/tutorial38.html

I think it's better than the wazim tutorial for skinning, because it teachs you how to skin on the GPU, instead of the CPU like wazims

PARTNERS