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#ActualKhatharr

Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:32 PM

So can you say whether this book is good.


If you understand it and are able to learn from it then it's a good book.

When I was first starting out I used textbooks heavily, but these days I use online references and if I want a book I try to get it in eBook format so I can have the actual book onscreen while I'm butchering my code. In my experience its far easier to cuss out the compiler when I have both hands free. (It reacts better when I make the gestures.)

That being said, if you're just starting on a language you should definitely seek out online tutorials before going for a book. This will help you two ways:
  • Is this the language I want? (Am I comfortable with it? Do I understand it easily? Does it 'flow' for me?)
  • If so then is the book/reference I'm looking at good for me/worth my money/download? (...or is it just $30 for the exact same thing I know from tutorials?)

Programming is not a single, established path that every person follows. At the very core, a programmer must be an intellectual trailblazer. A programmer is someone that builds a solution to a problem out of thin air and then expresses that solution through the tools available to them.

Find the road that takes you where you want to go.

#3Khatharr

Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:31 PM

So can you say whether this book is good.


If you understand it and are able to learn from it then it's a good book.

When I was first starting out I used textbooks heavily, but these days I use online references and if I want a book I try to get it in eBook format so I can have the actual book onscreen while I'm butchering my code. In my experience its far easier to cuss out the compiler when I have both hands free. (It reacts better when I make the gestures.)

That being said, if you're just starting on a language you should definitely seek out online tutorials before going for a book. This will help you two ways:
  • Is this the language I want? (Am I comfortable with it? Do I understand it easily? Does it 'flow' for me?)
  • If so then is the book/reference I'm looking at good for me/worth my money/download? (...or is it just $30 for the exact same thing I know form tutorials?)
Programming is not a single, established path that every person follows. At the very core, a programmer must be an intellectual trailblazer. A programmer is someone that builds a solution to a problem out of thin air and then expresses that solution through the tools available to them.

Find the road that takes you where you want to go.

#2Khatharr

Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:30 PM

So can you say whether this book is good.


If you understand it and are able to learn from it then it's a good book.

When I was first starting out I used textbooks heavily, but these days I use online references and if I want a book I try to get it in eBook format so I can have the actual book onscreen while I'm butchering my code. In my experience its far easier to cuss out the compiler when I have both hands free. (It reacts better to the gestures I make.)

That being said, if you're just starting on a language you should definitely seek out online tutorials before going for a book. This will help you two ways:
  • Is this the language I want? (Am I comfortable with it? Do I understand it easily? Does it 'flow' for me?)
  • If so then is the book/reference I'm looking at good for me/worth my money/download? (...or is it just $30 for the exact same thing I know form tutorials?)
Programming is not a single, established path that every person follows. At the very core, a programmer must be an intellectual trailblazer. A programmer is someone that builds a solution to a problem out of thin air and then expresses that solution through the tools available to them.

Find the road that takes you where you want to go.

#1Khatharr

Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:29 PM

So can you say whether this book is good.


If you understand it and are able to learn from it then it's a good book.

When I was first starting out I used textbooks heavily, but these days I use online references and if I want a book I try to get it in eBook format so I can have the actual book onscreen while I'm butchering my code. In my experience its far easier to cuss out the compiler when I have both hands free.

That being said, if you're just starting on a language you should definitely seek out online tutorials before going for a book. This will help you two ways:
  • Is this the language I want? (Am I comfortable with it? Do I understand it easily? Does it 'flow' for me?)
  • If so then is the book/reference I'm looking at good for me/worth my money/download? (...or is it just $30 for the exact same thing I know form tutorials?)
Programming is not a single, established path that every person follows. At the very core, a programmer must be an intellectual trailblazer. A programmer is someone that builds a solution to a problem out of thin air and then expresses that solution through the tools available to them.

Find the road that takes you where you want to go.

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